Need help removing toilet water feed pipe


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Old 11-19-18, 07:27 PM
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Need help removing toilet water feed pipe

First post: Iím working on a duplex renovation and ran into a water inlet pipe leading to the toilet thatís frozen. Iíve used channel locks and if I pull any harder Iím afraid the pipe will come out of the wall. Outside of a torch or cutting the pipe do I have any options? I tried to link a picture in the post, but it doesnít seem to work. The nut on the bottom is attached to the valve and not part of the feed pipe.

Name:  pipe.JPG
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Last edited by PJmax; 11-19-18 at 07:47 PM. Reason: Added pic from link
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Old 11-19-18, 07:49 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

That pipe looks well rusted in that valve. I would cut it off at the valve.
Using two pipe wrenches.... hold the pipe solidly and remove the old valve.
 
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Old 11-19-18, 08:22 PM
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Yeah, channel locks is likely not the right tool. You need a great big pipe wrench.
 
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Old 11-19-18, 08:27 PM
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Thanks for the reply. Sounds about right - thereís no give in that pipe at all.
 
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Old 11-19-18, 08:37 PM
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You'd have a better chance of getting the valve off the supply line but they may require heating the valve to break it loose.
 
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Old 11-19-18, 08:46 PM
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Iím thinking the best route is to cut out the old valve. Iím a little lost on plumbing fitting sizes. I know Iíll need to rethread the pipe and install a new valve. I assume thereís a standard size thread Iíll need to use on the existing pipe?
 
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Old 11-19-18, 08:59 PM
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That should be 1/2" galvanized pipe.

Me........ I'd try to get it off first. I'd rather not have to mess with threading.
 
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Old 11-19-18, 09:31 PM
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Ok, Iíll give that a shot then.

Assuming Iím able to remove it, that would leave a female connection off the valve. I believe I would then need to install a thread converter adapter to fit a 3/8 female compression fitting for the water line. Correct?
 

Last edited by Drfranecki; 11-19-18 at 09:31 PM. Reason: Spelling
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Old 11-19-18, 10:05 PM
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If I was doing it I'd replace the valve too. Even if it still works it is probably on its last leg. Use a modern quarter turn valve and braided stainless steel supply line.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 11-20-18 at 09:55 AM.
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Old 11-20-18, 08:15 AM
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I believe I would then need to install a thread converter adapter to fit a 3/8 female compression fitting for the water line. Correct?
Yes, an angle stop. Home stores sell several different varieties. You will want one to fit the 1/2" pipe threads X 3/8" Compression. They come in straight and angled, you want to angled stop.
 
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Old 11-20-18, 08:30 AM
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Would a Sharkbite valve work? Or is the supply line too thick?

https://www.homedepot.com/p/SharkBit...00LF/202270612
 
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Old 11-20-18, 08:58 AM
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Iíve heard of the sharkbite valves but didnít think of that. Iím going to start there. Thank you for the suggestion.
 
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Old 11-20-18, 09:04 AM
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I’ve heard of the sharkbite valves but didn’t think of that. I’m going to start there. Thank you for the suggestion.
I'm not sure Sharkbite will work with that pipe (the wall thickness may be too large), but it's worth looking into.
 
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Old 11-20-18, 10:13 AM
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The stub-out is galvanized pipe (I'm 95% certain). If so, then a Sharkbite won't work on it, and I'm sure you really don't want to cut and re-thread it.

It's probably also screwed into a fitting an inch or two into the wall, so the nipple could probably be changed out too if desired.

But the bad news is that most galvanized piping systems are nearing the end of their lifespan. It's possible of course it's only that nipple, but between the nipple and the shutoff, I'm thinking it's an older house, and you should evaluate the supply piping throughout the house.

It's possible it's in good condition and is still serviceable, but in many cases, galvanized supply pipes are on the verge of rusting, leaks, etc... and if you're doing a reno, now might be a good time to update the plumbing too.
 
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Old 11-20-18, 10:13 AM
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Iím pretty sure that unfortunately SharkBites donít work with galvanized pipe or PVC. They do work though with copper, CPVC, and PEX.

I would spray some of that PB Blaster on the stuff you want to take apart. Iíve had connections so rusted they wouldnít budge the slightest and I was all ready to give up. Someone told me about PB Blaster and it really worked. On really really bad stuff you might have to let in soak for a little while and try again Ė once or twice, but it really works. On some things it just takes seconds and you can loosen the connection right away.

But as was pointed out you need pipe wrenches to hold one thing and turn the other. (I donít know what you meant by ďpullĒ with the channel locks, it looks like those connections are threaded)

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Blaster-...6-PB/205178591
 
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Old 11-20-18, 01:18 PM
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The pipe is galvanized so I guess the sharkbite is out.

Iíve used PB blaster for automotive purposes, but will try it here.

And by pull I meant turn

 
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Old 11-20-18, 02:02 PM
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That galvanized pipe might be full of iron [rust] and might the same in the rest of the house. Go to any faucet in the house, open the valve fully and watch the flow, if the flow remains full it is still pretty good, if it starts flowing fast, then slows down, the pipe is closing up. Soon rather than later you will have to replace the old gal pipe with copper or pex or pvc. Good luck.
Sid
 
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Old 11-20-18, 04:03 PM
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The basement plumbing has been mostly replaced with copper tho there still are some galvanized sections. In general, waterflow in the house seems to be aqeuqate.
 
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Old 11-20-18, 04:13 PM
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When you remove the valve..... you'll get a better idea on the shape of the inside of the pipe. Don't try to screw that nipple out of the wall unless you are prepared to open the wall up. Although something like PB blaster will help..... I've found that heat (torch) is needed to heat the valve to melt the compound and rust.

LINK: Angle stop shutoff valve
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Old 11-21-18, 05:37 AM
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I went out and got a torch, PB blaster and a pipe wrench. Iíll head over there later today and weíll see what happens.
 
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Old 11-21-18, 06:03 AM
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and a pipe wrench
Not a pipe wrench. You will need two at least 12" size. A piece of pipe to use as a cheater may also be needed.
 
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Old 11-21-18, 06:06 PM
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Mission accomplished!! I hit the valve with a good coating of PB plaster, used a pipe wrench to hold the pipe coming from the wall steady and used an adjustable to turn the valve out.

Again, canít figure out pictures but here it is. Thanks again for the help.

Name:  pipe.JPG
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Last edited by PJmax; 11-21-18 at 10:41 PM. Reason: added pic from link
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Old 11-21-18, 10:43 PM
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When you took the valve off.... what was the condition of the inside of the pipe ?
How-to-insert-pictures
 
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Old 11-21-18, 11:48 PM
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It was in very good shape. I put the new valve on and got the new toilet hooked up. Everything is working as it should, no leaks.
 
  #25  
Old 11-22-18, 05:52 AM
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Perfect!!! (as the kids say today Ė lol). Sounds good that the inside of the pipe doesnít look bad at all. Maybe youíre lucky and all the piping is in pretty good shape.

Good luck and Happy Thanksgiving!
 
 

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