Replacing outdoor hose spigots. Came across conflicting information.

Reply

  #1  
Old 11-21-18, 10:04 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: USA
Posts: 8
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Replacing outdoor hose spigots. Came across conflicting information.

so I moved into an old house from the 50s, and I noticed that one or two hose bibs are leaking. I don't know how old they are but it's definitely warping the siding a little bit, which I plan to replace eventually anyways.

I would like to replace the bibs, however from what I've read you need to turn off the city water at the street which I'm not sure where it's located because I just moved into this house.

am I able to turn this off anywhere else? Like in my utility closet? Or does the outside faucets typically run from the meter itself?

Additionally, can I just seal off the spigot? Like leave the spigot and put a cap on it to prevent water from dripping?

I've also read that in the winter you want to drip your water a little bit, however I'm in North Carolina so I don't know if this is necessary.

basically I would like to stop this leak with the least amount of effort so if there's a stack app I can put on that would be great if I have to do more that would be okay but if I have to hire a plumber that would be more of a negative
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 11-21-18, 10:10 AM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 53,534
Received 408 Votes on 384 Posts
There should be a main water shutoff inside the house that turns off all water. Typically if you are in an area where pipes could freeze..... the faucets get shut off at inside service valves and then the faucet is left open for the winter. Just capping a leaking faucet will stop it from dripping but it can still freeze.

Do you have a basement there ? That's where the service valves are usually found.
Typically just inside the house from where it goes thru to outside.
 
  #3  
Old 11-21-18, 10:25 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: USA
Posts: 8
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks.

So it seems like for a temporary solution I can just get a cab from Home Depot and seal it. Then eventually replace it.


it's a slab foundation so no basement but there is a main room that has all sorts of valves I can turn off
 
  #4  
Old 11-21-18, 10:26 AM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 21,205
Received 260 Votes on 235 Posts
Most municipalities in NC have a shutoff at the water meter. Look for an oval or rectangular cast iron lid along the perimeter of your property. Most houses here do not have a separate main shutoff inside the home though some do. Look around where your water line enters the house.

Most faucets can be repaired. Your dripping spigots likely only need to have their washers replaced. If you post pictures of what you have we can tell you how to replace them. Here are instructions for posting pictures.

Do NOT cap off the end of your spigots and make sure there are no hoses attached during freezing weather. Either of which can cause the pipes inside your home to burst.

Whether or not to drip a faucet depends on your home and the weather (where you are located). Most homes here, even new ones, are not insulated or plumbed for temps below 10f except at higher elevations in the mountains. If you get temps below the teens, especially if it's for more than one night letting a faucet drip is not a bad idea. Look at your water heater. Often it's located in an unheated area so make sure you leave a hot water tap dripping. If your house is older and not insulated well you may need to drip a faucet when it's a bit warmer.

You also have to watch out for freezing pipes if you travel or are away from home for several days at a time. If you are at home your daily water use runs warm water through the pipes to warm them up. When you are gone no water is used so it doesn't get warmed up regularly and is more prone to freezing.

If your house has a crawl space make sure your crawl space vents are closed. If open they are a direct path for cold winter wind to blow under your house and freeze pipes.
 
  #5  
Old 11-21-18, 12:15 PM
steve_gro's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 1,091
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
This should be fine if your temps don't drop below freezing:

Everbilt-Lead-Free-Brass-Garden-Hose-Cap-3-4
Name:  cap.jpg
Views: 147
Size:  9.8 KB
 

Last edited by PJmax; 11-21-18 at 01:13 PM. Reason: resized pic
  #6  
Old 11-21-18, 04:33 PM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 4,581
Received 119 Votes on 110 Posts
Best option is to replace any old fashioned faucets with freeze proof hose bibs and just forget about having to worry about it again!

https://www.doityourself.com/forum/a...1&d=1542843192
 
Attached Images  
  #7  
Old 11-21-18, 06:41 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: USA
Posts: 8
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Pics of what I have

This is the current setup. Perhaps you can tell me the ease of replacing or capping it off.

Name:  wh.jpg
Views: 136
Size:  59.2 KB

Name:  wh2.jpg
Views: 128
Size:  83.5 KB

Name:  20181121_130316.jpg
Views: 139
Size:  83.6 KB
 

Last edited by PJmax; 11-21-18 at 11:49 PM. Reason: reoriented pics
  #8  
Old 11-21-18, 11:53 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 53,534
Received 408 Votes on 384 Posts
Your top picture is the water heater. Nothing to help us in that picture.
The second is the faucet and the third is some valves.

Is that faucet on the outside wall opposite those valves ?
 
  #9  
Old 11-22-18, 05:41 AM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 21,205
Received 260 Votes on 235 Posts
Your spigot can be repaired. It probably just needs a washer. You certainly should NOT cap it off. Capping it will trap water inside the faucet between the cap and closed valve. When it freezes the pressure from the expanding ice will have nowhere to go and it will crack the spigot.

You can replace the spigot with a modern frost proof design. You will need access to the back side of the faucet to install it however. And, a frost proof sillcock is over a foot long so it will stick way out on the opposite side of the wall. In modern houses they are installed to line up with an interior wall so it's hidden inside the wall. If your spigot is somewhere along the wall in a room then it and the piping will stick well out into the room.

Your photo of the valves doesn't tell us anything other than you have valves. What do the valves control?
 
  #10  
Old 11-22-18, 06:26 AM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 7,587
Received 89 Votes on 82 Posts
This is not criticism of your abilities, but as new home owner it appears you are oblivious of basic home owner information. Not being aware of or if a home has a main water shut-off is not a good sign. You need to map all your plumbing line and valves. Make sure they are all in good working order. Shut them all off, then turn on fully, then back off about a quarter turn. Do this about every six months to keep the seals moist and in good condition. If water leaks through the stem, it needs new gland packing, if it leaks at the spout it need a new washer.

I'll also assume that you may not know your electrical system. You should map all you circuit or fuses and determine what circuit control what outlets and switches. Identify your main breaker.

Again I'm not saying you're stupid or incapable, but buy a new home is a daunting project and you should know basic things. Like where is the shut-off for water located on your front lawn.

Coming to DIY is a first good step. Good luck.
 
  #11  
Old 11-22-18, 08:31 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,256
Received 139 Votes on 124 Posts
Best option is to replace any old fashioned faucets with freeze proof hose bibs and just forget about having to worry about it again!
That only works if the pipe is in a heated space, does very little if the hose bib line is in an unheated crawlspace.
 
  #12  
Old 11-25-18, 09:41 PM
steve_gro's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 1,091
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
basically I would like to stop this leak with the least amount of effort
In any event, it would be a very good idea to be familiar with the location of water & gas & electric shut-offs.

As far as I can tell, you don't have to worry about freezing in North Carolina. You will want your AC working in the summer.

 
  #13  
Old 11-26-18, 06:01 AM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Southeastern Pennsylvania
Posts: 2,948
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
But it looks like a third of the state is seeing freezing temps already and its only November.
 
  #14  
Old 11-26-18, 08:04 PM
steve_gro's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 1,091
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Darn... the image has changed since I posted it. Yesterday it showed NC to be completely in the temperate (no-freeze) zone. The OP has some homework to do. Although, if his area required frost-free hose bibs you'd think they would've been installed at some point.
 
  #15  
Old 11-27-18, 06:08 AM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 21,205
Received 260 Votes on 235 Posts
It really depends on where you're located in the state. The coastal areas cool much slower in the fall and often don't see freezing temps until well into December while parts of the west froze in October. But, a dripping sillcock is better than one that has been capped.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: