Help Removing Plastic Shut-Off Valve with Insufficient PVC Pipe Clearance


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Old 12-16-18, 05:23 PM
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Help Removing Plastic Shut-Off Valve with Insufficient PVC Pipe Clearance

I'm trying to remove a plastic shut-off valve but I'm not certain what type of shut off valve it is. It doesn't look like a standard compression valve, and I don't believe it is soldered on (since it's plastic). I've watched several youtube videos which only talk about removing compression valves and soldered on valves, and Google does not mention anything about removing plastic shut-off valves.

I'm assuming the best way to remove it would just to cut it, but any verification would make me feel more comfortable. I'm looking to replace it with a Sharkbite push-to-fit 1/4 turn shut-off valve, however if I have to cut it off I am not sure I will have enough clearance from the floor to install the push-to-fit valve which typically requires 1.5" of clearance on the CPVC pipe and I have about 1" of clearance. Any ideas how to best replace this leaky shut-off valve?







 

Last edited by carmenohio; 12-16-18 at 05:40 PM.
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Old 12-16-18, 05:39 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

Interesting...... plastic valve.
The fitting in the top is a 1/2" NPT to 3/8" NPT reducer.
Since the top of the valve has a 1/2" female thread...... I'd assume the bottom is the same.
The valve says CPVC on it so it may be glued on to the pipe coming thru the floor.
 
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Old 12-16-18, 05:54 PM
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Thanks for the response. The house has CPVC pipes. The supply lines for the faucet in the same bathroom are similar, and below is a picture of how those look to give you a better idea of what we're working with:



The house also has one bathroom that was remodeled, which had these shut-off valves replaced with what appears to be push-to-fit 1/4 turn valves - however there was significantly more CPVC clearance on these supply pipes to do this install.



I'm thinking there's no easy way to replace this leaky supply valve without changing out the CPVC pipe to extend the pipe, but I'm definitely open to any ideas.
 
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Old 12-16-18, 06:00 PM
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You can do the same thing but you may end up having to remove the escutcheon and using something flatter.
 
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Old 12-16-18, 06:19 PM
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Any suggestions what tools to use or how to best cut the pipe to leave me the most clearance? I don't think a regular CPVC pipe cutter will fit to make that cut, and it would probably cut the pipe a half inch shorter too and I can't afford to lose any more of my supply pipe. I was also hoping there was some way to remove it without cutting it.

Also in the remodeled bathroom, they used a push-to-fit shut-off valve as a replacement, but reading up on these push-to-fit shut off valves they generally require 1.5" of clearance. Even with a flat escutcheon, this would be difficult to achieve. I think the CPVC pipe will need to be extended from the basement but hoping there's other options.
 
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Old 12-16-18, 09:45 PM
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In that application I'd use a Sharkbite valve. It requires 1" of pipe to connect to. I linked to one below.
Sometimes you can crack or split those valves apart. Otherwise you'll need to use a hacksaw to cut the pipe as straight as possible just under the old valve.

Sharkbite stop valve
 
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Old 12-17-18, 03:48 AM
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All you have to do is remove the remove the flex line from the top of the current valve, add a screw-on quarter turn valve and reattach the flex line to the top of the quarter turn valve. No cutting required. One such valve for a 3/8 inch connection is a Keeney K2072PCLF. I am sure there are other sizes and manufacturers. Make sure you shut current valve off before removing the flex line.
 
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Old 12-17-18, 07:20 AM
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If you are replacing the valve because of a leak, it looks like the leak is actually from a hole at the bottom of the brass reducer, near the CPVC valve but not the CPVC valve itself. At least it looks like a leak to me. Just mentioning that in case you didnít know.

It seems to me you could use a hacksaw blade and carefully cut the CPVC pipe right where it comes into the bottom of the valve. In other words, the saw blade would be rubbing up against the bottom of the valve as you made your cut.

After you removed the old valve and escutcheon, I think you would then have enough pipe left to glue on a CPVC coupling and extend the CPVC pipe. I think you could cover the coupling if you wanted with a new deep bell escutcheon.

I think that would work Ė but Iím no expert (I do have some CPVC in my house and have done things with it).
 
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Old 12-17-18, 10:54 AM
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That valve is cracked by the valve stem and should be replaced.
 
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Old 12-17-18, 01:22 PM
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I see a crack near the stem and also what looks like a seam. I would probably replace the valve in any case - but where actually is the leak? It looks like some funny stuff coming out of the hole in the reducer, like solidified glue or something. Maybe someone tried to put something around the hole to fix it and thatís where it is leaking.
 
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Old 12-18-18, 04:23 AM
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My response was for a leaking valve, not a cracked valve. The leak I assumed (maybe incorrectly) was the valve would not stop water flow when turned off. Could someone identify what pic shows a crack in the valve body?
 
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Old 12-18-18, 04:32 AM
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The 1st picture possible crack center of wrench flat or a jagged one to left on same face.
 
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Old 12-18-18, 06:07 AM
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Well this is what I think I see and the hole is in the reducer, not the valve. Looks like something must have been plugged into that hole. Funny stuff coming out of it.

Or...Is that funny stuff on top of other cracks on the valve body? Doesn't look like that to me. It just looks like stuff on the plastic valve body surface. But turned 74 and the eyes ain't what they used to be - lol.
 
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Last edited by zoesdad; 12-18-18 at 06:36 AM. Reason: added "Or...
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Old 12-18-18, 08:15 AM
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I agree with you on the crack. That's what I saw. That "stuff" looks like silicone glue.
 
 

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