Was this bath renovation done correctly?


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Old 01-01-19, 12:17 PM
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Was this bath renovation done correctly?

Hello, we are remodeling our master bath. Fiberglass tub was pulled out and since then, when hot water is run in the bathroom sink on the other side of the wall, there is a loud click or drip sound coming from the wall. The contractor thinks it is because the large dark pipe in the master is expanding. I feel it is very important to address this issue before the tile goes up. They have addressed it by putting insulation in spaces around the pipe. This has deadened the sound quite a bit. However, I'm wondering if this is the correct thing to do, if there are other ways to address the drip sound, and if the white piping is still OK now that it is bent because of the insulation behind it.

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Last edited by PJmax; 01-01-19 at 07:26 PM. Reason: labeled second picture
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Old 01-01-19, 12:31 PM
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I'm assuming that black pipe is a vent. If so I wouldn't think temp differentials would affect a pipe full of air. I think the drip noise is directly connect to the bathroom sink and most likely the drain trap.

Try this...Remove the wad of insulation around the black pipe. Have someone run the bathroom sink while you hold the black pipe. Can you feel and movement or vibration and does is make the noise while holding it?

Another possibility is that the studs may be expanding/contracting slightly around the steel plates because there is no wall board/cement board attached to it.
 
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Old 01-01-19, 12:37 PM
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Yes, you can feel the pipe move while holding it during the drip sound. I know it's not the drain trap because that's under the bathroom sink, and I hear the drip noise at eye level and higher. This is frustrating because you are right - it's a vent. Why would there be a drip sound in a vent. The contractors say it is the expansion of the pipe. But it never made the sound when the fiberglass tub was in place.
 
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Old 01-01-19, 12:54 PM
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Before wall boarding, experiment. Using perforated strapping, try to tightly secure the vent pipe to a stud. Or wedge a piece of 2 x 4 between the stud and the pipe to secure it. Does that stop the vibration? Is you vent pipe covered on the roof to prevent ice, snow or birds from falling in?

Can it be that the plastic supply lines might be causing vibration and transmitting to the pipe? Put some of that insulation on the upper set of pipes also.
 
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Old 01-01-19, 01:59 PM
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OK, thank you Norm. We'll try that.
 
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Old 01-01-19, 04:00 PM
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You paid someone to insulate this and it looked like that, Hmm.
The insulation behind that pipe and the wiring is useless, likely just going to make the wall bulge out.
How tight is the hole in the top and bottom plates to the black pipe?
From those pictures to me it looks like they notched the studs instead of drilling a hole in the center of them, big mistake.
 
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Old 01-01-19, 05:01 PM
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I would assume it's not actually the vent, but instead the white PEX pipe expanding as the cold/hot water flows through the pipe. When the PEX pipe expands slightly, it's rubbing against the wood or black ABS pipe, and you're hearing the noise of the pipe moving against it.

If you can prove that's what it is, you might be able to better secure the PEX pipe, or wax the wood so it slides better. You can always make the holes bigger, but that's more work too.

I doubt the vent is really making much noise on its own.
 
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Old 01-01-19, 06:16 PM
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Notching the studs is fine as long as it isn't more than 25% of the width for load bearing, 40% for non load bearing.
 
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Old 01-01-19, 06:28 PM
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The studs are clearly drilled, not notched, so that is a non issue.
 
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Old 01-01-19, 07:21 PM
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But it never made the sound when the fiberglass tub was in place.
That's because the wall was closed. You are going to hear the sounds of water dripping when the wall is open.

In the bottom picture..... I would add blocking to the water supply lines above the shower valve.
 
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Old 01-01-19, 07:21 PM
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The insulation behind that pipe and the wiring is useless, likely just going to make the wall bulge out.
Joe, if you take a close look at the photos you'll see that no wiring is involved, it's all pex piping. And the insulation could not be put over the piping because it's too close to the stud edge (not really good, but no harm in this instance). And that insulation isn't really bugging as much as the pics shows. With cement board being nailed to the studs, there's no chance of bulging.

At first glance I thought the same as you.

PJ...I agree, but I think it's already there, just covered by the insulation.
 
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Old 01-01-19, 07:27 PM
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Not the valve..... above it. Any place where the lines can vibrate and hit the sheetrock.
 
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Old 01-01-19, 07:45 PM
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Oh! Yes agree. Especially where they make those right angle turns. Good point.
 
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Old 01-01-19, 08:35 PM
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So if I'm reading this correctly, there should be wood blocking behind the pex, at least where it connects at a right angle. Should the pex be affixed to the wood by a metal strap?
 
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Old 01-01-19, 09:15 PM
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More pictures of the drilled/notched studs

Here are additional pictures of the drilled studs in the corner of the shower. I am concerned that the strength of the studs is compromised. I am about to affix some very heavy tiles on the wall, and it needs to hold up.
 
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Old 01-02-19, 03:09 AM
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No, you're fine. If the studs were in a bending mode from the side, there might be a concern.
 
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Old 01-02-19, 07:08 AM
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Those latest pics DO look like notches. But as mentioned, not a big deal since the notch is small and its in a non load bearing wall.
 
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Old 01-02-19, 05:52 PM
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Should the pex be affixed to the wood by a metal strap?
Metal or plastic are fine. The pex shakes/vibrates when the water is turned off so anywhere it can hit the sheetrock or vibrate excessively should be minimized.
 
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Old 01-02-19, 06:49 PM
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I use the mickey mouse pipe strapsfor through hole. Never an issue with noise..

Use strap for pipe size. And drill hole in stud size of strap so it fits in hole..

Thats what they are made for. Any real plumber will use these.



 
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Old 01-02-19, 06:55 PM
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Like this.

 
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Old 01-02-19, 08:01 PM
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Thank you

Thank you to everyone for your replies; they've all been extremely helpful!
 
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Old 01-03-19, 05:45 PM
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How tight is the hole in the top and bottom plates to the black pipe?

I think this is the problem. It's January and the vent pipes are obviously cold. You say in your first post this only happens when the hot water is running. Plastic DWV pipes running vertically up through the house and out the roof can GROW (normal expansion) an inch on a one level home when the hot water is running down the drain. If the pipes are tight against the wood framing, they will make noise as the pipe moves. I had 2 different plumbers tell me this years ago, but I only experienced hearing it in a new home one time. It's weird, but makes perfect sense.
 
 

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