Threaded Copper Sink Shutoff Valve?

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Old 01-14-19, 01:34 PM
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Threaded Copper Sink Shutoff Valve?

So I am trying to change out the faucet in our kitchen and I went under the sink to turn off the water. Turn the handle of the valve and I start to get a few drips of water on my hand. Open the valve back up and all seems fine. So in short, I want to change out the valve. Normally not a problem. I've done these before. Except, in our new to us 1940's house, nothing is fun.

The original galvanized has been replaced with copper in all but one area of the house (don't get me started on that), but kitchen is indeed copper. So I take a brief look, run to the hardware store get the valve I need and come home. Low and behold I should have looked closer because this isn't a standard compression or sweated on shutoff valve. It is a threaded copper connection it seems. Odd to say the least so I am kind of at a loss of what to do. Is the only real option to cut the pipe and start over since there isn't a don of space under the sink to work (and I'd probably go sharkbite to avoid burning the house down? I am really hoping I don't have to to that, but I guess I could in a pinch.

I've attached pictures of both the hot and cold valves. Note that the site is orienting the pictures so that they are rotated 90 degree for some reason. Pipes do run up and down under the sink.

Thanks!

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Last edited by PJmax; 01-14-19 at 06:16 PM. Reason: cropped/reoriented/resized/enhanced pictures
  #2  
Old 01-14-19, 01:53 PM
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Threaded angle stops, even the double stops like you have, are not uncommon and available. You could turn off the water, unscrew the old valve (hold back on the copper) then screw a new one on (with teflon or pipe dope on the male threads).

https://www.amazon.com/Quarter-2-Inc...J5HYDWYQVZ4DEQ

But first you should try tightening the packing nut on the existing stop. Just a little, perhaps 1/8th of a turn. Might be all it needs.
 
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Old 01-14-19, 01:59 PM
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Yeah I had located those threaded ones at the hardware store, but they said for iron pipes so I wasn't sure if there would be an issue with with a metal mismatch or not. Seems as as though all the shutoffs are the same.

I'll try the packing nut first. That hadn't even crossed my mind since I'm not used to there being a packing nut to fuss with on those valves!
 
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Old 01-14-19, 06:52 PM
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Brass is fine on copper or galvanized pipes (brass is an alloy of copper and zinc). If you wanted to connect copper to galvanized, you would separate the two with 6" of brass (or stainless).
 
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Old 01-14-19, 07:18 PM
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Thanks That'll be good to know since the packing nut tightening seemed to work.
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Now to get the 1.5" nut off that is holding the current faucet on. I am not looking forward to that tomorrow. I imagine it is going to involve a drill.
 
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Old 01-16-19, 09:51 AM
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Threaded angle stops, even the double stops like you have, are not uncommon and available.

I quit using sweat valves and stops years ago and always use the threaded variety matched to a male threaded adapter. It costs a little more to install this way, but it sure is a lot easier to replace that valve or stop down the road.
 
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Old 01-16-19, 10:00 AM
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Yeah makes sense.
I ended up swapping out the valve because it was still leaking and it was easy enough to swap out.
Now I need to get the dang faucet out It's a PF with a giant nut that is going to require a very large basin wrench
 
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Old 01-16-19, 10:08 AM
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It's a PF with a giant nut

What's a PF? Sounds more like a PIA.
 
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Old 01-16-19, 10:25 AM
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Lol. Price Pfister. I forgot it was PP and not PF. But yes, total PIA
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