Exterior spigot (not frost-free) leaking into house


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Old 02-08-19, 08:12 AM
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Exterior spigot (not frost-free) leaking into house

Hi all,

First time posting here, hoping to get a little insight into my situation. I've googled and searched and just find the same explanations of frost-free pipes bursting with a hose attached over winter, but I don't know/think that applies to me because I don't have a frost-free faucet. Maybe it's the same idea, but I don't know.

Last fall I noticed that there was a small leak in my basement, and I traced it back to where the water pipe exits the wall for the backyard spigot. I noticed it leaking while the faucet wasn't on, and hadn't been on for days. I couldn't see the actual leak from anywhere in the pipe, I could only see the water dribbling down the wall, so it looks to be coming from the spigot itself and into the house somehow, or else in the pipe directly behind the spigot but still in the wall. But I can't really tell.

For a clearer picture, the pipe from the spigot goes into my basement about 12 inches, and is then soldered into a shutoff valve, which I've closed and it's been closed for months now. But I'd like to get this fixed and be able to use the faucet in the spring.

If it's just a leaky washer or something in the spigot, could that result in water in the house? Or is it the pipe in the wall? Any help is appreciated, thanks.

https://i.imgur.com/LFsYWNU.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/Vy66AAM.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/vtWEm3W.jpg
 
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Old 02-08-19, 08:22 AM
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Copper will eventually split if it freezes multiple times. So my guess would be that if it leaks when your shutoff valve is turned on... and doesn't leak when you turn the valve off, that the copper is likely split inside the brick where you can't see it.

If you aren't saavy enough to DIY, you would need to hire a plumber to replace the spigot. Changing to a frost free valve and leaving the hose off in winter should take care of the problem.
 
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Old 02-08-19, 08:33 AM
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If water is leaking into the house it is nothing like needing a new washer. The pipe has likely developed a leak most often the result of freezing. When you work on it replace your sillcock with a frost proof one. And NEVER keep a hose connected to the spigot in freezing weather.
 
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Old 02-08-19, 08:43 AM
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Thanks. Obviously, I'd like to do it myself if possible, just wanting to get as much info as I can before starting. Sounds like I'll be replacing the whole thing with a new frost proof assembly.

Any indications from that photo of how much work I have ahead of me in removing this one? Just a good ole hammer and chisel to clear that mortar away? The old one doesn't seem to have any screws or anything, just the mortar.
 
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Old 02-08-19, 08:50 AM
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As mentioned, if you live in an area prone to freezing, you should have frost-free faucets. The new ones also have an anti-siphon valve on them. Be sure that the installer angles the new faucet down and out so it empties when it is shut off or it will still freeze. I know this because...
 
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Old 02-08-19, 09:17 AM
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And is there any opinion on something like the Sharkbite Push-to-Connect sillcock? I assume that people prefer solder, but these things have good reviews.
 
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Old 02-08-19, 09:23 AM
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They work ok where you have access to inspect for leaks... but you may have trouble figuring out exactly how long to cut your existing copper pipe. Cut it plenty long the first time so that you can cut it again to fit.
 
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Old 02-08-19, 10:06 AM
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They work well but you may have to enlarge the hole for the fitting to slide thru. I can't open your pics. Firewall.
 
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Old 02-08-19, 10:15 AM
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In your case I would not use a Shark/Gatorbite fitting. Soldering or NPT fittings will lend support and strength to help hold your new spigot in place since you can't use screws.
 
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Old 02-09-19, 11:02 AM
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In your case I would not use a Shark/Gatorbite fitting. Soldering or NPT fittings will lend support and strength to help hold your new spigot in place since you can't use screws.

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