Controlling a shared pump system.


  #1  
Old 03-25-19, 10:56 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 32
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Controlling a shared pump system.

ok, new house is on a shared well and both houses utilize same diaphragm/tank and pressure pump. Well is on other side of the street from me and on the other guys power (I just pay him $10/mo). Now I replaced some shutoffs today and got water back on for the first time since taking ownership of the place. He says it's a 20/40 pressure switch but I didn't go into his well house to check for myself. Anyways there is hardly any pressure/volume at all. You can plug the hose with your finger and feel pressure build but not a ton and when you let off barely anything happens and its back to a slow stream. Instead of thousands on my own well I am going to just build my own small pump house/shed and get a water tank, pressure pump, bladder tank and pressure switch. I obvioulsy can not put a normal float switch in my tank to kill the pump because he needs it to run for his house and it is on the other side of the street. I am thinking of using something like this but I don't know if there's a better option actually intended for such a purpose.

https://www.amazon.com/Kerick-Valve-...gateway&sr=8-3

I do know that at my parents off the grid house in baja the gravity fed water system in the camp fills there tank through just a regular toilet ballcock fill valve type deal my dad installed in the neck of the tank and it works fine...
 
  #2  
Old 03-25-19, 11:06 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Jersey
Posts: 62,035
Received 3,415 Upvotes on 3,063 Posts
I changed the title to better reflect the thread.

Shared wells are always a problem. With a shared well..... the pressure should be 40-60 minimum not 20/40.

The part in your link is of no help.
What are your plans...... to still get water from your neighbor but have more pressure ?
If that is the case...... get the biggest pressure tank you can fit/afford. Use that, a check valve and booster pump. Your booster pump would have a pressure switch. You don't need to control the well pump...... when you use water it will come on.
 
  #3  
Old 03-25-19, 11:26 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 32
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
trying to use water from across the street to fill my tank, then have my own pump/switch/bladder to pressurize my own system. pretty much have my own well I just have no electrical control over the pump filling my tank so I need something to shutoff the flow and then once the line is pressurized his pump will stop. I don't really mean I want to control it, just that I cant so I have to find another way to stop the pump when my tank is full. I also want to hold my own water in case the power goes out I have water because my generator can power my system but him without a generator wont be sending me any water with no power.

but for an idea what order would the items you say be installed in? line coming in->check valve->booster pump->pressure tank?

I feel like he said the pressure tank on his side was only something like 4 or 5 gallons. I was looking at a 20 gallon, bigger would be nice but I have a lot of money going out all over the place on the house because I am redoing everything.

I know its pretty ghetto but to get by cheap at first I was considering just a 275 IBC(which I have) with a float valve, and a cheap setup like this fed from the tank... https://www.harborfreight.com/1-hp-s...gph-63407.html

I eventually would setup something a little better but I really need something to at least get me by if I can't go all out right now.

another consideration I forgot is I have to install a pretty good filtration system as there's a good deal of iron and who knows what else in the water(have the test kit but want to flush the lines a little more before I test). I would like to install the filter before my pumps/tanks but I don't think I have the required pressure/flow for the filter to work properly but I'll have to go look up the requirements for that.
 
  #4  
Old 03-26-19, 03:44 AM
pugsl's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: United States
Posts: 8,161
Received 76 Upvotes on 69 Posts
If you have a storage tank and you are just worrying about how to stop flow when tank is filled put a floating shut off valve. A toilet shut off comes to mind.
 
  #5  
Old 03-26-19, 05:03 AM
A
Member
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 4,348
Upvotes: 0
Received 250 Upvotes on 230 Posts
Treat* the system at your neighbor's house as a bare well, not as a shared water supply.

What is an IBC?

Better method: What you first suggested. Order of parts: Feed from neighbor goes through a float fill valve (nothing powered) into a non-pressurized tank (cistern) and then to the (standard shallow well style) pump, then a check valve and to a standard bladder pressure tank with pressure switch for your pump only. Then to your plumbing. A second, independent, float switch in the non-pressurized tank shuts off only your pump if the level gets too low.

If you use a toilet fill valve and it is too slow under the best of conditions then you could split the feed into two or three toilet fill valves. They do not have to be calibrated to all shut off at exactly the same moment.

Simpler method: Connect your own standard shallow well pump directly to the neighbor's feed and go through check valve into your standard bladder pressure tank. Possible problem in that your pump may suck the neighbor's system dry.

* Not "treat with" as in "with chemicals."
 

Last edited by AllanJ; 03-26-19 at 05:41 AM.
  #6  
Old 03-26-19, 07:29 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 32
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Its a somewhat thin plastic container inside a metal cage that can be stacked. https://www.ntotank.com/275gallon-nt...-tank-x7738445 the issue I would have to get creative with is that since the tank walls aren't rigid a float valve wouldn't work too well but nothing a stainless plate sandwiched to the tank at the location of the valve couldn't solve.

I have mine setup already with a 3/4 ball valve and right now has garden hose threads but I could swap to npt pretty quickly.

if I were to suck his system dry it would make him have to re-prime his pump, correct? I saw the pump and I actually think it was a jacuzzi brand and was red I think and just looked like any old jet pump... I really don't have the details on his pump either but I really want to make sure I'm not causing the guy a bunch of headaches with his own water supply.
 
  #7  
Old 03-26-19, 07:16 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Jersey
Posts: 62,035
Received 3,415 Upvotes on 3,063 Posts
The "tote" you linked to is not for potable water or food use.
You'd need this one.... Rebottled IBC tote

If you wanted to operate in harmony with your neighbor..... you'd establish a time period to fill the tank that didn't interfere with his use.
 
  #8  
Old 03-27-19, 06:54 AM
Z
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 5,822
Received 363 Upvotes on 325 Posts
Did you mention how far away his well is from your house?

Even with a 20/40 pressure switch, you should be getting decent pressure and volume. It might be a problem if you're running multiple fixtures at once - but many people run their houses at that pressure with no real problems. So I'm wondering if there isn't another issue with the existing system. Pete/Allan, any thoughts on that - you both I'm sure have more experience with the intricacies of wells than I do.
 
  #9  
Old 03-29-19, 11:12 AM
O
Member
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Canada
Posts: 607
Upvotes: 0
Received 8 Upvotes on 7 Posts
OK. First, you do not need to shut off the flow. The air pressure in your new pressure tank will shut it off for you. Once the pressure builds up, enough that your neighbor senses it, his pump will shut off the flow. There, that problem is solved.

If your neighbor has 20/40psi and you are across the street, ,my guess is that you have probably at least a 5psi reduction. God forbid your house has an upstairs, then it would be even worse. I would have to see the distance, elevation and piping bends to guess better, but instead of guessing, why don't you put a manual pressure guage on a threaded tap and see for sure what you are getting. You will need to do this to set the air pressure in your pressure tank anyway, so why not buy the $10 guage right now, before you buy any other expensive equipment.

Remember, a pressure tank does not create water pressure. It takes the water pressure the pump builds up in the pressure tank and then provides that built up pressure, when the pump is off. So it is your neighbor's pump that will provide your house pressure, not your tank. Setting your new pressure tank to 60 psi will not create a 60psi water pressure if the pump is only providing you 35psi. I hope that makes sense.

My guess is that you need your neighbor to supply you with more water pressure or you need a pressure boosting pump in your house. 20/40 from across the street is not going to cut it in your case.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: