Question on shark bite valves

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Old 04-07-19, 07:51 AM
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Question on shark bite valves

I installed my first shark bite angle valves on 1/2 inch copper today. Are they supposed to be able to pivot around the end of the copper pipe? When I first saw that I was reluctant to turn the water back on but so far no leaks.
 
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Old 04-07-19, 08:12 AM
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You shouldn't turn them but they can turn. They form their seal with the pipe via an O ring and not a hard mechanical connection like soldering or gluing.
 
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Old 04-07-19, 08:37 AM
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Turning the any Sharkbite fitting can and will cut the "o" ring seal. You may be able to get away with it few times but not continuously.
 
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Old 04-07-19, 08:41 AM
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I definitely don't intend to spin them. I was just thinking they would spin naturally when you open or close the valve. I'll just make sure I grip it with the other hand before doing that.
 
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Old 04-07-19, 08:43 AM
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Never saw an installation that might cause a valve to twist as you turn the handle,
 
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Old 04-07-19, 11:29 AM
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Yes. Sharkbites spin continuously but that does not seem to cause it to leak. It is normal for sharkbites.

That said, I don't understand why they cannot fix this issue. I find it annoying and worrisome as well.

I figure the teeth that bite into the copper or pex could possibly be fixed. Then if you needed to reorient the fitting, after installation, one could use the removal tool to release the bite and allow you to turn it, then when you release the tool, the bite would fix it solid again.

I suspect they know this is a problem, so the fact that they have not fixed it makes me think it is more challenging to them then I am thinking. I emailed the Sharkbite company once because I have an outside tap on a sharkbite fitting and everytime I pull the hose it twists and turns like a yoyo. They said that it was normal and it would not be a problem.

So far they have been right. I have had that issue for about 2 years now and no leaks.
 
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Old 04-09-19, 10:20 AM
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I didn't think turning the push-fit fittings would affect them at all. The o-ring should be turning inside without a problem, and the teeth still grip the pipe.

Of course I wouldn't use it intentionally like that, but I wouldn't be concerned when it does.
 
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Old 04-09-19, 02:27 PM
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Turning the any Sharkbite fitting can and will cut the "o" ring seal. You may be able to get away with it few times but not continuously.
I'd like to retract my statement. I have heard wrong information from previous conversations. After further study of how the Sharkbite seals, rotation or twisting should not be a problem. The only problem I see is if removing and re-inserting the unit might have burrs from previous contact with the gripping mechanism. So twist away!
 
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Old 04-10-19, 07:15 AM
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I have an outboard motor that goes on a boat. When I need to change the impeller (engine cooling water pump) I pull the lower unit down. The drive shaft from the motor comes down with the lower unit. At the upper end of that drive shaft they have a simple "O"ring. That "O"rings purpose is to keep water, that is completely full in the mid section from shooting up into the engine.

At wide open throttle, that drive shaft spins at around 5000 RPM and the motor I am using was built in 1975, and runs like it just came off the production line.

So I suppose spinning may not be as detrimental to a seal as one might think.
 
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