sillcock replacement question

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  #1  
Old 04-14-19, 09:40 AM
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sillcock replacement question

Hi all. I have a sillcock with what seems to be an integrated vacuum breaker, which is leaking. I plan on replacing the sillcock, just wanted to be sure it's as simple as it looks. Does the sillcock just unscrew?

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  #2  
Old 04-14-19, 10:51 AM
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Actually it looks like you have a sillcock with an add-on vacuum break. They come with a screw that is designed to break off when it's tight so that it can't be removed, so if you look around it you will probably find a hole where the screw is. Regardless though, you said that you want to replace the sillcock, and you can buy it with an integrated vacuum break. As far as replacing it, yes, it looks easy from this angle, but the back side is where the work is. You will need to gain access to the back of it through the basement, crawl space, or wall, depending on where it is. Then it's a matter of whether it's threaded, soldered, or whatever. And, depending on where you are, I would replace it with a no freeze type, which is going to extend inside considerably farther.
 
  #3  
Old 04-14-19, 11:01 AM
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I didn't see a screw, i see a spot that looks tack welded.
the house is on a slab, so access must be inside the wall,.
 
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Old 04-14-19, 11:12 AM
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As aka pedro said you will have to have access to the back of the sillcock to determine how it is connected. Some are soldered on and some are threaded. Even if it’s threaded you have to be careful if the pipe is copper. If the sillcock is threaded and is on real tight, you have to be sure you hold the pipe behind with a wrench as you turn the sillcock or you can actually twist the copper pipe into a pretzel trying to turn the sillcock off of the pipe (ask me how I know-lol).

Just had a thought. Don't know whether the other guys here would think this is crazy, but if you have to cut open the wall to gain access, maybe you could hope the sillcock is threaded on and try turning it without applying too much pressure. I guess it would be a little bit of a gamble but if it is threaded it might start coming right off without a tremendous amount of pressure.

I would try it (if I couldn't get access behind) but others may disagree.
 
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Old 04-14-19, 11:52 AM
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I would try it (if I couldn't get access behind) but others may disagree.
If you try it...... just be prepared for it to snap off.
 
  #6  
Old 04-14-19, 11:59 AM
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What looks like a spot weld is probably where the screw broke off. But irrelevant, in your case anyway, because if it's leaking it's leaking, and that's the faucet, not the vacuum break. But I did happen to think later that I went along when with you saying you wanted to replace the faucet, and, as long as it's not totally shot, that may not be necessary. You'll have to shut the water off someplace before the faucet, remove the handle, then the brass nut below the handle, and might be able to find the replacement stem parts at your local hardware or big box.
 
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Old 04-14-19, 12:00 PM
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Hopefully there is an access panel or something.

I think I need a correction to my previous post (the elderly brain is slow -lol). I think the time I twisted the copper pipe into a pretzel, it was in fact soldered on and but I just thought it was threaded. Just now came back into memory a little clearer.

Was my bad assuming it was threaded - and I think I used a tremendous amount of torque (like a dummy) - which should have been a clue that it wasn't threaded.
All a vague memory.
 
  #8  
Old 04-14-19, 04:53 PM
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What's leaking is the little holes on the vacuum breaker , and only when you turn on the water. The handle opens and closed normally , and turns the water off just fine. It's just when it turn it to open, a bunch of water is coming out if those little holes, and not much pressure going into the hose.
 
  #9  
Old 04-14-19, 05:25 PM
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Then that is a defective vacuum breaker. You could replace that if the fastening screw wasn't broken off. Without being able to release that screw..... the breaker won't come off.
 
  #10  
Old 04-14-19, 05:28 PM
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That breaker unscrews. You just screw a new one on.

https://www.lowes.com/pd/american-va...YaAgUBEALw_wcB

 
  #11  
Old 04-14-19, 05:42 PM
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ok, thanks for all of the info. I will look at it closer in the daylight tomorrow. It does sound like the screw might be broken off. Maybe I can drill it out, then loosen it.
 
  #12  
Old 04-15-19, 06:50 AM
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Thanks again. I was able to drill out the screw and remove the old breaker .installed the new one, all is good now.
 
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