Moving shut-off valves for vanity

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  #1  
Old 06-08-19, 04:26 PM
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Moving shut-off valves for vanity

we just purchased a vanity that has a drawer across the center of it. The drawer has about a 5" notch for the plumbing. This notch is big enough for the drain to fit in, but the hot and cold shut off valves don't fit since they are separated by about 6". . The shut off vales protrude about 3 1/2" out from the tile wall. With the drawer fully closed the vanity will not fit flush to the tile walll since the back of the drawer hits the end of the shut-off valves. There's about 1 1/2" from the back of the drawer to the back of the vanity. If the shut off valves were placed 10" lower it would fit fine since they'd be below the vanity's drawer. I'm wondering what my options are getting this vanity to fit. I like to not cut open the file to reroute the water lines if I don't have to.
 
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Old 06-08-19, 04:49 PM
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Sounds like the valves should be tight against the wall with 90 degree angle supply lines. If they were, would that help? A pic of your shutoffs and the drawer would be nice.
 
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Old 06-08-19, 05:08 PM
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Old 06-08-19, 05:22 PM
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How much more room to you need for tight fit? If you remove the handles would that help? If it's only an inch, I would unsoder the valves and look for a smaller profile and shorten the pipe length. But you still want to have access to them.
 
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Old 06-08-19, 06:38 PM
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When the vanity drawer hits the shut-off valve the vanity's countertop is about an 1 1/4" from the tile. And even if it did fit then the only way to access it would be to pull the drawer out to make some room to get my hand in there.
 
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Old 06-08-19, 07:06 PM
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Looks like you will need to cut the copper and sweat elbows on so that you can move the shutoffs.
 
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Old 06-08-19, 07:14 PM
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Can I do that and have the copper running down in front of the tile ? Or does it need to be behind the tile wall ?
 
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Old 06-08-19, 07:50 PM
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As long as your cabinet has no back you can do whatever you want in that area.
 
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Old 06-09-19, 04:57 AM
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I don't recommend it, but back in the 70's (and maybe still) many homes were built without isolation valves at all. You could just remove valve and sweat elbows.
 
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Old 06-19-19, 11:43 AM
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I rerouted the water lines. My next issue is installing the faucet. In this vanity there are wooden supports for the sink. The supports are directly underneath and in line with the hot cold sink holes so it's hard to attach the stainless steel water lines to the faucet. Any suggestions as to how I can do this. The attached link has pictures from inside the vanity so maybe will help clarify things

https://drive.google.com/drive/folde...JeZDU2La-A8Wtp
 
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Old 06-19-19, 11:48 AM
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So would it cause any problems to notch out the offending members just enough to allow the water supplies to connect?
 
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Old 06-19-19, 03:30 PM
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I was thinking of doing that but wondering if that would compromise the support.
 
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Old 06-19-19, 04:03 PM
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Notch them only as much as you need to. Normally you want to put the faucet and supply lines on the countertop FIRST... then set the countertop on top of the vanity. Then hook them up to the shutoffs LAST.

But at least this way you can see exactly how much you need to notch.
 
  #14  
Old 06-20-19, 04:50 AM
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This vanity came with the countertop already adhered to the vanity. I'll detach it from the wall which will give me slightly more access and try to install faucet. Thanks for the suggestions !
 
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