Need Help with proper way to raise Sanitary Tee

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  #1  
Old 06-13-19, 09:16 AM
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Need Help with proper way to raise Sanitary Tee

I bought a new freestanding vanity to replace a pedestal sink. Once I had everything disassembled and went to push the new vanity back in place flush with the wall I discovered the sanitary tee is too low. I would like to raise it (about 6 inches) because where it comes into contact with the vanity is structural to the vanity itself.

I’ve read through other posts but many seem to involve a sanitary tee which has been installed horizontally and they are worried about proper slope. I haven’t fully opened the wall just yet but can tell that the one behind my wall is installed vertically. So I believe I just need to raise it but I want to use the proper method to do so.

I’ve read posts that mentioned cutting out the sanitary tee, extending a new sanitary tee with extra pipe and then using Fernco couplings to join it all back together (much like in the attached YouTube video link), but I also read other posters mention that rubber couplings would not be to code. Also, would it be better to union & glue the extender pipe below the sanitary tee and use the fernco coupling above for the vent?

I’d like to know the proper way and steps. Also which tool you would suggest to get the cleanest cut on PVC pipe.
Thanks

https://youtu.be/yKdkd6Uy2kg

 
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Old 06-13-19, 10:09 AM
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A simple rubber Fernco is not approved. To comply with code you need a shielded coupling which is basically a rubber Fernco with a stainless steel wrap around the outside. It installs the same as a plain rubber boot. One good thing about using the proper shielded coupling is it adds more structural strength to the mounting of your T.
 
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Old 06-13-19, 01:06 PM
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Like the ProFlex? Thanks Dane!
 
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Old 06-13-19, 01:12 PM
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Since you know it's vertical, it should be a pretty easy change/fix. Definitely cut out a decent size piece of drywall, your biggest frustration will be trying to work in a really small hole.
 
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Old 06-13-19, 01:22 PM
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Other than swapping out the rubber Fernco for a shielded rubber Fernco - do the steps in the video pretty much cover all the steps.

Also, I assume good straight 90 degree cuts are important - which tool does the best job on pvc?

Thanks!
 
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Old 06-13-19, 01:47 PM
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Any feedback on whether a primed/cemented union is better than joining with a shielded Fernco?

I figure it will be possible to use a cemented union below and a Fernco above the new sanitary tee connection (if this is better).

Do Ferncos need to be supported with a strap when pipe is vertical?
 
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Old 06-13-19, 05:37 PM
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I am in in Internet challenged area so viewing videos is not an option.

A glued union is cheaper than a shielded coupling but I don't know if it will be stronger. When installing during new construction stacking up and gluing fittings is no problem but when doing repair work you usually have to consider what is easier to install.

If you go with a shielded or Fernco rubber boot both are much easier to install if you lubricate the inside of the coupling and outside of the pipe with dish soap and water.

Even though plain rubber boots are not approved they can be easier to install as their inside is just a straight, smooth tube. This allows you to slide it completely onto one piece of pipe and then down to make the connection. Shielded couplings usually have a raised ridge in the middle that prevents you from sliding the coupling onto a piece of pipe more than half way making it about as difficult to install as a glued fitting. The big benefits are no time crunch since there is no glue quickly hardening and there is no glue smell or mess.

Plain rubber boots (Fernco) are not approved by code and my inspectors don't allow them in new construction but they are pretty liberal in allowing them in repairs. In old underground piping with settling I have seen them stretched a crazy amount out of alignment and still not fail or leak so I have no reservation using them.
 
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Old 06-13-19, 06:19 PM
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Thanks again for all the good advice Pilot Dane.
 
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Old 06-13-19, 06:46 PM
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Also... it looks like I can purchase the “stainless steel shear rings” separately and use them with the regular rubber couplings. (To avoid the installation issue the interior ridge might present)

 
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