Removing a rotted galvanized nipple from wall

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Old 07-25-19, 12:26 PM
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Removing a rotted galvanized nipple from wall

Hello I have a hole from rust in a galvanized nipple under the kitchen sink. I was able to remove the elbow bent joint from the the nipple but finding difficulty removing the nipple that connects to the wall. the nipple is about 4or 5 inches long so have some length to play with I am hoping not to damage it make it that much harder to remove. any advice on the the best ways to remove it? although the nipple is rusted by where the thread meets the elbow the nipple is not very old I would say it was put on about 3 or 4 years ago. right now I am spraying blaster lubricant on it. should I also put some heat on it to loosen it? If I can remove the nipple I can repair it myself without getting a plumber. Thanks in advance.

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Old 07-25-19, 03:31 PM
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A bigger wrench is usually what I go for. The smallest pipe wrench I carry is a 14" and I don't hesitate to grab a bigger one. Sometimes I'll whack on the end of the wrench with a 3 pound mallet. At best they are difficult to remove and at worst can be almost impossible. Once I had to remove the cabinet to allow enough room for a really big wrench.

I don't think heat is going to help much since NPT is a tapered thread and the kind of heat it would need (from a torch) risks starting a fire.

After you get the old nipple out consider replacing it with PVC, it's much easier to remove.
 
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Old 07-25-19, 04:46 PM
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Pilot Dane Tomorrow I will try a bigger wrench and give it some wacks if needed also if I am successful I will replace with PVC .
 
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Old 07-25-19, 07:47 PM
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I'm hoping that will work, but it never has for me.
I end up using a saws all with a metal cutting short blade to make 3 cuts on the inside to weaken it and crushing it with a pair of channel locks.
Then cleaning it up with a wire brush that looks like a tooth brush and replacing it with a PVC male trap adapter.
 
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Old 07-26-19, 05:20 AM
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I've smacked more than a few wrenches to help break something loose, but for pipe fittings I typically go for a piece of pipe or unistrut over the handle to increase the leverage first.
 
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Old 07-26-19, 06:16 AM
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I would be concerned if that galvanized nipple screws into another piece of galvanized piping/fitting or if it screws into cast iron. There is a very high probability that all the galvanized piping all the way to the cast iron needs to be replaced.
 
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Old 07-26-19, 07:16 AM
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yea pedro a piece of pipe for leverage might be ideal but my space is limited under the kitchen sink but i will see if I can get some leverage
 
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Old 07-26-19, 09:50 AM
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I think the larger pipe wrench is your best bet, but I agree with CasualJoe that you might want to plan on possibly replacing that whole run of galvanized pipe. Most/all galvanized drain pipe in use right now is pretty much past its lifespan. Between it being notorious for clogging up with grease as well as rusting through from the inside, it probably could use replacing with PVC.

Depends of course on how much of a renovation you're doing right now though!
 
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Old 07-26-19, 02:42 PM
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If the piping in the wall is traveling vertically it's probably OK for now. If it's a 90 leading into another horizontal run then that horizontal section is probably in about the same condition as the pipe nipple.
 
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Old 07-26-19, 02:57 PM
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For those suggesting screwing in PVC - will the threads match? I probably have some similar repairs in my future so it'll be good to know. Would teflon tape or pvc-compliant pipe dope be a good idea?
 
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Old 07-30-19, 03:56 PM
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UPDATE: I didn't have enough leverage with the bigger wrench. I decided to let my plumber deal with it. he was done in about a hour. he cut the old nipple then replaced it with PVC pipes. Thanks everyone for your input.
 
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