preparing outdoor faucet for freezing temperatures

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Old 10-29-19, 08:15 PM
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preparing outdoor faucet for freezing temperatures

With freezing outdoor temperatures approaching, I'm wondering what is the best way to prevent water from freezing inside the water line supplying my outdoor faucet.

I'm thinking I definitely need to close the supply valve in the basement. And then should I leave the faucet open as if the water is running? Or should I close the faucet? Thanks.
 
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Old 10-29-19, 08:59 PM
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Yes..... turn the ball valve off and leave the outside faucet open. Once that is done you could loosen that little brass cap on the valve and all the water will drain out of the valve and line.
 
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Old 10-30-19, 05:05 AM
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And then should I leave the faucet open as if the water is running? Or should I close the faucet? Thanks.
You're undoubtedly in a colder climate than I am but I wait an hour or two then close my faucets once they're dry.
 
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Old 10-30-19, 05:15 AM
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You need to close the inside valve and leave the outside valve open as said.
All it would tahk is 1 drip/week and the pipe would be full by spring.
You should occasionally look at the open faucet and a small icicle would tell you the inside valve is leaking.
 
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Old 10-30-19, 05:25 AM
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Do exactly as Pjmax said.
Be sure to drain the water out of the line with the small brass cap.

Leave the cap on but loose.

After an hour or so check that the water has stopped dripping.
 
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Old 10-30-19, 07:40 AM
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I only turn my outside water off when it gets cold enough and rarely for more than a week or so but I always turn off the valve feeding the exterior spigots and leave those spigots open. Been doing it that way for 25+ yrs.
 
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Old 10-30-19, 07:54 AM
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Personally if I had an outdoor faucet that accessible I would install a freeze proof faucet and never give it a second thought!
 
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Old 10-30-19, 08:32 AM
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I live where it gets to 40 below and do what Pjmax stated for over 45 years and never had a problem..

As far as freeze proof faucets have a friend who has one which froze and split the first year.
Needless to say he no longer has one.

So it all depends on where you live.
A couple minutes shutting the system down correctly will save hours fixing your plumbing.
 
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Old 10-30-19, 12:26 PM
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It also depends on where the other side of the freeze proof faucet is. If it isn't in a heated space it won't be effective. My exterior faucets come out of the crawlspace and would freeze when the temp drops. When I bought my place there was one freeze proof faucet, installed outside next to a post - I guess the previous owner didn't under stand the concept
 
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