frost proof spigot in finished wall

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Old 11-30-19, 08:28 AM
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frost proof spigot in finished wall

i have a spigot on an outside wall where the inside is a fished wall. Do I have any options for s frost free spigot that would work? the wall in only 6 in thick.
 
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Old 11-30-19, 08:45 AM
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I suspect it may get very cold in Wisconsin. Hopefully there should be a way to shut the spigot off from the inside. If not, cover the spigot with an insulated cover. There are frost free spigot systems available that trap the water inside the house but your wall situation may not provide sufficient space for such a fix.
 
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Old 11-30-19, 09:18 AM
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I've not seen a frost free spigot that would work in that situation. An insulated cover might be worth a try, but it's sort of a double edge sword because it's not going to stay warm behind the cover without at least some heat, and the only heat source would be what you're losing through the walls. Your best bet, in my opinion, and as Tony mentioned, is to find a valve that you can shut off where it is warm, then leave the outside one open. It's probably not too late yet, but will be before long, so if you can't find a valve inside now is the time to install one. What have you done in the past? Or is this a new to you house? Was this always a finished wall, or is this work something new?
 
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Old 11-30-19, 09:28 AM
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i have a spigot on an outside wall where the inside is a finished wall
Typically the frost free spigots are installed in the joist area which give them some additional room but they do make shorter versions to install in a wall.

https://www.woodfordmfg.com/woodford.../Model-14.html

But, your going to have to get into the wall, most likely from the inside to make the water connection!
 
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Old 12-05-19, 08:20 PM
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Finally getting back to this. Also noticed that my Bio is wrong. We movedto GA just outside of Atlanta a couple of years ago so it isn't quite as cold as WI. Since I am about to start finishing the basement, I am going to take the time to relocate the faucet so I can use a frostfree faucet. I just don't want to ahve to worry about cracking the valve open on cold nights.
 
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Old 12-06-19, 05:03 AM
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I livein NC and frost free work fine for me. They freeze and break if I forget to drain hoses connected to them.
 
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Old 12-06-19, 05:32 AM
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I'm in NC as well and go through the freeze thaw cycle almost every day for 2-3 months each season. I have never had a freezing problems with frost proof faucets... if you don't leave a hose hooked up.
 
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Old 12-06-19, 03:55 PM
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So my issue is the faucet in off a basement wall. I am going to have to relocate the line somewhere where I can get the depth I need for the frost free faucet
 
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Old 12-07-19, 03:47 AM
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Since you're going through the effort, include a shut-off. I can't imagine running a line for a new spigot and not putting in a shut-off. A frost-proof spigot is probably adequate but a shut-off will eliminate the potential for problems - as long as you remember to use it.
 
marksr voted this post useful.

Last edited by Tony P.; 12-07-19 at 05:52 AM.
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Old 12-10-19, 09:44 AM
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Frost free spigots are not foolproof. They rely on a metal pipe to which they are connected to conduct heat to them to keep the water inside from freezing. They are more likely to freeze if your plumbing system is plastic or if the air space they penetrate into the house is well insulated from interior heated air space.
 
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Old 12-10-19, 12:41 PM
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I am at a loss to understand several of the answers in this discussion. I have frost free spigots on my house in Ga and have no problems--again, if the spigot is closed and the hose removed. But my knowledge of the device is that the knob on the spigot drives a shaft that is 6 to 18 inches from the outside wall and at the end of that shaft is the washer that stops the water (inside the heated space) and the shaft is sloped to allow the water to drain once the valve is closed.
 
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Old 12-10-19, 04:46 PM
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Problems can occur if the washer is worn and leaks, and also the shaft is not properly installed and slopes the wrong way or the hose was left attached outside.

There are different conditions practically all of which do not cause a problem by themselves but it is possible for a few combinations or permutations of those conditions result in a perfect storm so as to cause freezing.

A separate shutoff valve inside also prevents tampering and theft of water. It is important that the slug of water between the shutoff and the spigot not be in a space that is insulated from the inside and that could reach freezing temperature.
 
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Old 12-11-19, 07:20 PM
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The whole idea of a frost-free spigot is that instead of the valve being a 1/2" from the handle, like in a normal every-day faucet, the valve itself is 8"-16" deeper into the house, hopefully into the heated space. So it's almost like turning off the water in the basement, then any water left in that 16" pipe just drains out.

Hoses are a big problem, since they don't let the water drain out.
The other issue is if they are installed in a non-heated space - which is just silly. I saw one installed with the 'inside' portion in an unheated crawlspace. Didn't help much since the pipes in the crawlspace froze anyway...
 
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