Floor too low/toilet too high

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  #1  
Old 06-10-01, 12:51 PM
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We replaced the floor in our bathroom and now the floor is too low for the toilet to sit on the floor. It kind of does a balancing act on the pipe which is a pvc insert into the main sewer pipe. Now thats thinking ahead right?
What can we do now to fix this problem without ripping up the new vinyl and building up the floor? As a temporary fix we are using wedgies to hold things up but they keep coming loose. Any ideas?
 
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  #2  
Old 06-10-01, 01:11 PM
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How high is the flange above the flooring? It should sit right on top of (and be bolted to) the floor. Then the toilet is bolted to the flange.
If a toilet moves at all (as yours is), the wax seal will leak, damaging the flooring. If the full weight of the toilet is sitting on the wax seal, it will definitely fail.
Can you get to the pipe under the floor (basement or crawlspace)? If you can, you may be able to hacksaw out a small section of it to lower it, and re-connect the pipe with a Fernco coupling (a rubber sleeve with two large hose clamps).
The other alternative is to level the toilet and shim around under the lip of the base with beveled shims. Snug the toilet down on the shims so that it won't move. (Not TOO tight, you may crack the base.)
There are plastic beveled shims made for the purpose, and I use beveled cedar shingles strips. Either will work.
You can use tub & tile caulk around the base to hide the shims and the gap.
If neither of these will work for you, you may just have to fit two sections of pressure-treated plywood to fit under the flange and the toilet base.
Good Luck!
 
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Old 06-10-01, 05:47 PM
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Floor too high

If the pvc pipe is secured to the sewer line and it is too high, simply pull toilet and useing a flat handsaw or recipr. saw , cut pvc pipe flush with floor and depending on what size the pipe is you can get a 4" by 3" pvc flush floor flange and if 3" glue it over the pipe, if 4" it will glue or cement inside the 4" pvc pipe. If cast iron pipe you can snip off pipe with a crecent wrench by adjusting the wrench to fit over the edge of the pipe, no more than about 1/4" at a time all the way around the pipe careful to keep it as smooth as possible. next, you can get a compression type flange, cast iron, and secure it to the pipe and the floor.there are other ways to fix this problem, if these want work you can contact me and I will help you futher.
 
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Old 06-10-01, 07:02 PM
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AHA!
A pro, apparently (I'm not). John Mallory has ANOTHER alternative.
If your pipe is 4" ABS (black plastic), you can make four cuts through the flange (careful not to cut into the pipe) and chip the old flange out with a chisel.
Then cut it off as John suggests, and glue in a new flange flush to the floor.
Good luck!
 
  #5  
Old 06-10-01, 07:03 PM
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AHA!
A pro, apparently (I'm not). John Mallory has ANOTHER alternative...and a better idea.
If your pipe is 4" ABS (black plastic), you can make four cuts through the flange (careful not to cut into the pipe) and chip the old flange out with a chisel.
Then cut it off as John Mallory suggests, and glue in a new flange flush to the floor. Voila!
Good luck!
 
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Old 06-11-01, 06:52 AM
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Thanks for the replies guys! Looks like it depends on how much more effort we care to put into it. Quick fix with shims or rip it up and try again.
I went downstairs to look for myself and what we have is a PVC "T" attached to the metal sewer pipe on one side and the sink drain on the other. It appears to me that the pipe with the flange is one piece entering the "T". The flange is broken on one side now anyway so the best way is to redo it. Looks like our mistake was doing the pipes before we had the floor in...we tore out the floor to the joists and rebuilt it...but we happened to have "help" with the plumbing that day so we went for it. We assumed the floor would end up the same height since it appeared we replaced it with the same thickness of boards. Whoops!
Next will be trying to see if the "T" comes apart or is one piece...no one remembers...but at least we now know we can cut it off and get an insert if it doesn't. I would hate to have to replace all of those pipes!! Again!
We will go with the Shims until then....I happen to have both cedar and plastic laying around!
Thanks for all your help Old Guy and John...it's good to know your options BEFORE you go messing with things!
 
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Old 06-11-01, 03:05 PM
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CALL A PLUMBER BEFORE YOU BREAK THE

TIOLET. ITS CHINA ANY UNEVEN PRESSURE WILL BREAK THAT BABY AND THEN YOULL HAVE A REAL PROBLEM.
 
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