Non-Invasive Water Flow Monitor Streamlabs


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Old 09-24-20, 09:45 AM
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Non-Invasive Water Flow Monitor Streamlabs

I am trying to separate some water supplies (for monitoring) and am trying to figure out a way to do it without putting shut-off valves on every line. I was thinking of getting a streamlabs monitor which I can probably get for $125 or so (on the secondary market. I am waiting to hear if I will get ANY reading from a 1/2" pipe since it is made for 3/4". Anybody have any experience of another way to detect water movement in a pipe with no cutting? Thanks Much

 
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Old 09-24-20, 10:13 AM
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According to their specs, it lists:
Compatible Pipe Sizes: 3/4 in. CTS, 1 in. CTS
I would assume it would not work on 1/2" pipe. If it did, I'm sure they would list it.
Since it's ultrasonic, I'd imagine being loosely clamped on the pipe wouldn't work.
 
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Old 09-24-20, 10:50 AM
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Thanks, I think you are right. The company says it has to be tightly clamped and then calibrated. Makes sense. Only other way I can think of is temperature change, and since I am interested in cold water pipes, sounds like a pain. I did see a fairly inexpensive thermistor for pipes. I will have to look into the associated gear. I donít want to spend a great deal, I was just thinking that this would be easier than putting in valves. I think the supply to 2nd and 3rd floor are connected in one of two supplies to the third, and want to separate them.
 
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Old 09-25-20, 10:31 AM
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You may be able to tell using a stethescope too. Sometimes it's hard telling where the water is running, but you should be able to hear water running at an elbow or fitting.

A mechanic's stethescope might be a good purchase:
https://www.amazon.com/Lisle-52500-M.../dp/B0002SQYSM
 
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Old 09-25-20, 10:46 AM
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Thanks, worth a try! Have you tried this before?
 
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Old 09-26-20, 12:50 PM
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Fortunately (?) I have never had to. But a handful of years ago, I watched a plumber use a stethoscope to locate an underground water leak. They definitely detected a leak with it, not sure how much they were able to locate it. But sure enough, the leak was right where they expected it, under a stone porch.
So it does work - and for something simple like water running, it should work pretty easily.
 
 

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