How to remove toilet valve without damaging pvc feed pipe?


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Old 11-01-20, 03:25 PM
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How to remove toilet valve without damaging pvc feed pipe?

It's my only toilet so I don't wanna start another repair project if you feel me.

 
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Old 11-01-20, 03:33 PM
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Its so dirty its hard to tell if the pipe coming out of the wall is 1/2" copper or 1/2" galvanized. And without knowing that we really can't tell you how to remove it. Its either threaded onto a threaded galvanized pipe nipple or sweated onto a copper pipe.

As far as the pvc line is concerned, it could easily be replaced with a braided toilet supply hose. Not really a "project" to replace it. But if you needed to save the $8 it would cost to buy a new supply hose, you would simply unscrew the nut and screw it right back onto your new shutoff valve. You would likely have to reuse the old nut because its possible that there is a compression ring on the pvc that will not come off.
 
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Old 11-01-20, 03:35 PM
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Thanks. The main pipe is some sort of pvc, plastic.
 
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Old 11-01-20, 04:24 PM
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I've never seen a plastic valve with a hex base like that.
Unfortunately you need to figure out what type of pipe it is. If it's CPVC, it'll be terminated differently than PEX.

 
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Old 11-01-20, 04:37 PM
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you think it's threaded on the pipe? I know my main piping is that grey pipe that was recalled. IDK if coming out to the fixtures it's the same. I don't know plumbing. It's got a hex end right at the valve presumably to hold it in place while you unscrew the hex nut at the pipe. I'm just lubricating it for now.
 
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Old 11-01-20, 04:55 PM
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You should be able to tell if its threaded by looking at the pipe where it meets the shutoff. It likely is threaded since that's the reason the back of the shutoff is cast in the shape of a nut.
 
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Old 11-01-20, 05:07 PM
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yeah, I don't feel any threads. I'm about to wing it...
 
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Old 11-01-20, 05:16 PM
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Generally, if its threaded, you would hang onto the pipe nipple with one pipe wrench to keep it immobilized while turning the shutoff with another wrench. You don't want the pipe nipple to loosen inside the wall, and you don't want the pipe to experience any torque that might break it.
 
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Old 11-01-20, 06:15 PM
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Thanks. that looks like what I've got going on here. I'll be careful with it. try it in the morning...
 
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Old 11-02-20, 08:00 AM
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If you can get a can of that PB Blaster and squirt some in where the threads are, that may help a lot. Iíve had really good success with that PB Blaster loosening rusted joints. I donít remember how long they tell you to wait before you try loosening the joint, but Iím sure directions are on the can.
 
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Old 11-02-20, 11:13 AM
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Thanks for the help. Sorry, I made a mistake. It's indeed standard copper. I've got bad eyes. I figured out too on pvc tube you need to use a pvc compression sleeve rather than the copper looking one the valves come with duh. I just reused the old one. After a couple trial and errors it worked out. That must be the best part of a plumber's day, finding no water after turning the water back on.
 
 

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