Main Water Shutoff Valve

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  #1  
Old 11-23-20, 01:27 AM
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Main Water Shutoff Valve

The pictures are from the main cold water shutoff valve in my house (most likely the original). The house was built in 1986 and I have been living here since 1998. I used this valve a few times at the beginning when I did some renovations and it worked fine and I have no leaks or anything except it just looks agley and corroded.

Should I have it replaced or perhaps there is something I can use to clean all the corrosion on it especially around the ground wire clamp? If I was to clean it only is there a danger to create a leak?

Itís a hassle to replace it because I will have to get the City to turn off the water by the street and then have them come back to turn it on.




 
  #2  
Old 11-23-20, 07:23 AM
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Why not turn the water off at the street yourself?
 
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Old 11-23-20, 07:55 AM
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Most municipalities I know they don’t allow to mess with the street water main + in any case you need this special tool, looks like it’s about 6-8 feet long, which the city uses to access the underground valve. Perhaps in USA its different but not in Canada
 
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Old 11-23-20, 08:41 AM
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I agree with other posters, I know of no city in our country that requires the user to get permission to use the val. e.

What you have is an gate valve, what you want is a full flow ball valve. They do make reduced flow valves for some reason. You also want to be sure that the valve you are using for replacement is lead free. They do sell both kinds.

Gate valves are cheaper than ball valves, They also weep/leak. Which is why you have the galvanic action going on with the ground wire. I suggest that you call around and get a plumber to do this work for you. If you not familiar with soldering it can be frustrating when the joints leak.
I had a home in Phoenix and went to sell it. The home inspector for the buyer for some strange reason tried to turn off the main valve. The handle broke off so I was forced to fix it in an emergency situation.
I would get this fixed sooner than later. It is a hassle turning off the water for the house at the street.
 
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Old 11-23-20, 08:42 AM
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Don't you have a city water meter outside somewhere? Usually there is a shut off valve near the meter.
 
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  #6  
Old 11-23-20, 09:36 AM
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I would leave that shutoff as is.
Turn it off for one last time, then cut* the pipe downstream (about one foot above it). Install a new shutoff valve there. Now you can shut off the water as needed without having to disturb the old valve.

* Before cutting the pipe, turn off the shutoff above the water heater and then drain the cold water system from as low a point as you can but not using the water heater drain valve. This will minimize the amount of water that you have to wait for to come out at the place you cut, before you can finish the project.


 
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Old 11-23-20, 11:04 AM
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There are no water meters in my municipality + the other ones around but some municipalities further away do have water meters and I know in that case it’s easy to shut off the water supply. My shut off valve is located under the street and if there is something wrong with it the City will have to dig a big hole on the street to fix it and that’s why there are fines if you touch the valve on the street.

I know about valves as much as anyone, it was part of my work when I was younger but now, although I know how to replace a valve, if I have to replace the valve I will get a plumber. The time comes when you know your limits (hopefully), and then you decide what you can/can’t do.

Since the valve does not leak my preference will be to clean the corrosion somehow and leave it as is. My problem is that I have no idea if the corrosion has/could penetrated the soldered connections and that’s what I want to find out here.
 
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Old 11-23-20, 11:08 AM
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If it's not leaking, and it shuts off reasonably well, I wouldn't bother replacing it.

The corrosion at the ground clamp can be scraped off with a wire brush, but I wouldn't worry much about it unless it becomes a leaking issue. If it ever does start to leak, (which could be another few decades), it will be a slow leak. Again, not a huge concern.
 
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Old 11-23-20, 12:37 PM
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Many thanks Zorfdt, now I feel much better. As for the”....(which could be another few decades), if I make it even for one more decade....then I will be very lucky LOL.

Much appreciated
 
 

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