Laundry Valve + Pipe

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  #1  
Old 01-20-21, 11:32 AM
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Laundry Valve + Pipe

Hi --

I am in the process of fixing up an old house I bought and have run into a minor issue with some old pipes in the laundry room. The old laundry hook ups were leaking so I am replacing them with new valves at the moment. When removing one of the valves I noticed that corrosion has caused the pipe threads to fuse with the main water pipe -- pictured here:



I've tried a few tools to remove the small portion of the thread that is fused with the pipe, but nothing is working. I have yet to try a pipe nipple extractor tool but am thinking that might not even do the trick due to the shape the pipe is in (it's in bad shape).

Ideally, I want to make sure the threads are all clear before I insert a new pipe/valve and hook up the new laundry machines. I am worried also that in general these pipes are in really bad shape beyond just the issue highlighted above.

Looking for expert advice on if I should continue to try and extract and clear the corroded portion of the pipe with a nipple extractor and move forward with the small project myself or if this might just need the expert eyes from a plumber or professional.

Any advice is appreciated and I can provide more answers/details as needed here!

Thanks!
 
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Old 01-20-21, 06:46 PM
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That is an awful lot of corrosion in that pipe.
Do you have steel pipe in your house ?
In other words...... is the plumbing not all copper ?

Based on that mess the previous washer valve screen would have to been plugged.
Possibly that's a well system ?

I wouldn't even mess with trying to get the threads out of that elbow.
Solder on a new one.
 
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Old 01-21-21, 06:31 AM
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My first thought was different types of pipe . But that looks more like crud build up coming through the pipes as opposed to corrosion of iron or steel pipe.
 
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Old 01-21-21, 07:34 AM
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I'd cut it off and use pex pipe with shark bite fittings. I go copper for straightforward stuff but when it gets hinky, I go shark bites and pex.
 
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Old 01-21-21, 08:59 AM
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Based on that mess the previous washer valve screen would have to been plugged.
At one time I also had an issue of crud like that plugging the water inlet valve screens on my washing machine. I found that combination washer/screens in the female hose coupling at the washing machine would capture the crud and would make for a much easier job to clean out the crud than digging the screens out of the water fill valve every year. The whole house sediment filter solved the problem completely. The crud was coming from the city water main. Haven't had to clean sediment from a faucet aerator in many years either.
 
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Old 01-21-21, 10:09 AM
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Not a plumber but my thinking is that has got to go. You can try cleaning out the threads in the fitting. I’ve already used something like a pick to scrape everything out and off the threads. Maybe that would work. If you clean it up you can buy a cheap plug like this:

https://www.lowes.com/pd/Mueller-Pro...E&gclsrc=aw.ds

- and use some Teflon tape (and maybe also some pipe dope on top of the tape) on the plug and you can then see if the joint is leak-proof. If so then you could go buy another valve. But if after your best efforts it leaks with a plug, then you are probably out of luck and will either have to solder on a new fitting or use a Sharkbite.
 

Last edited by zoesdad; 01-21-21 at 11:11 AM.
  #7  
Old 01-21-21, 12:02 PM
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Thanks for the feedback and comments -- the piping that is visible to me is mostly galvanized steel and the water source is a public water system.

I am worried about the level of corrosion and general quality of the pipes here as I work on the area. Here's an image of the laundry hookups and area when I first started working on them - notice the staining on the walls stemming from the valves.


The valve on the left was more straight forward to fix and less corrosion and build up was present. The current set up looks like this as I build out the laundry room in general (with a snapshot of the valve that was already replaced) -



Overall, I am just having some reservations about the valve and pipe on the right since it's in considerably worse shape. I am considering consulting a plumber to get a better eye on the overall situation.
 
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Old 01-22-21, 12:11 PM
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H i flyers –

Are you sure your pipes are steel? In post #1 picture 2 that just looks like a copper female elbow and somebody used a steel pipe nipple to connect a female valve to the elbow. I’ve done that already and the nipple corroded after a while, since I have very acidic well water. The copper won't corrode like that. Maybe you just have some corroded pipe nipples and other piping is OK.

But you don’t have to use steel pipe nipples. If you get brass male valves they can screw right into the female copper elbow. Like these for example:

https://www.amazon.com/American-Valv...052EDY52&psc=1
 
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Old 01-23-21, 10:49 AM
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that just looks like a copper female elbow
flyers -

I meant brass elbow in last post - my bad.

Anyway thought you might be interested in a pic of a steel nipple I used and how it corroded. You can see the buildup inside. My understanding is that usually the steel pipes corrode from the inside. I don't even think I had that nipple installed for that many years. But my water is very acidic. You can see how the water flow would be obstructed in that pipe. I make sure I don't use steel pipe anywhere.

(left is new nipple for comparison)




 
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Old 01-25-21, 04:36 PM
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I think you are correct! I dug up the older valve that was already replaced and the buildup/corrosion looks identical.

I'll have to rethink the approach and make sure to limit the use of steel and ID where it's currently being used..

Thanks for the help and thoughts!
 
 

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