Reinforcing hose bib pipes


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Old 03-08-21, 08:54 AM
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Reinforcing hose bib pipes

In the recent Texas gulf coast freeze we had 2 failures of 1/2 CPVC pipe at the exterior wall hose bib attachments. Im considering using a 1/2 galvanized tee and nipple for the stub out for the new hose bib connection and wondered if anyone had tips on methods to anchor the piping in the wall to improve stability / sturdiness? I can use threaded adapters to mate CPVC to the galvanized pipe. Ive always worried about exterior CPVC and the fragility of a plastic fitting.

TIA
TF
 

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03-08-21, 03:54 PM
joecaption
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I just cringe every time I see some southern plumbing!
Galvanized pipe will corrode and fail every time at some point, far faster if it's in direct contact with a dissimilar metal!
In VA I have not seen CPVC used in at least 10 years, all new construction is done with PEX.
 
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Old 03-08-21, 09:18 AM
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Avoid the problem altogether and install a frost proof sillcock.

 
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Old 03-08-21, 09:47 AM
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install a frost proof sillcock.
That might help the stability/durability issue (although the one shown also has plastic parts) but won't help much when the power is off and there is no heat inside the house.
 
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Old 03-08-21, 10:04 AM
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I always install exterior faucets which have a flange on the bottom like the frost-free pic above. That way the faucet can be securely attached to the house without relying on the pipe to support it.

If you do go the route of using steel/galvanized pipe, standard U clamps work pretty well to secure it. They are sized so that they hold pretty tightly if screwed tightly. Of course, you'll need to drill next to a joist or add some 2x4 blocking to give it something to be secured to.
 
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Old 03-08-21, 03:54 PM
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I just cringe every time I see some southern plumbing!
Galvanized pipe will corrode and fail every time at some point, far faster if it's in direct contact with a dissimilar metal!
In VA I have not seen CPVC used in at least 10 years, all new construction is done with PEX.
 
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Old 03-12-21, 06:43 PM
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That frost proof sillcock assembly is certainly not a shelf item on the gulf coast of Texas. Ive had good success with 1/2 galvanized pipe, never had it corrode or fail. I believe I will go that route and just clamp / block and support it as best I can. Thanks for all the feedback.
 
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Old 03-12-21, 06:58 PM
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Is the topic of this thread the physical strength of metal versus plastic where a PVC plumbed hose bibb might be snapped off of the wall if the hose was tugged carelessly?

As far as the pipes freezing in a house with no heat and no power, perhaps the best strategy is to be able to pivot between draining the plumbing and hydronic heating, and evacuating, and coming back home after power is restored and refilling everything, more than twice on short notice.
 
 

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