Leaky drain trap a sign of bigger issues?


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Old 04-15-21, 06:37 PM
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Leaky drain trap a sign of bigger issues?

There seems to be a hairline crack at the bottom of the drain trap of my utility sink. The odd thing is that it seems to be leaking when I use the bathroom sink one floor above. Should I simply replace the drain trap, or is this potentially a larger issue as to why that would leak when a different sink is in use? How is the water getting into that trap? I have a marked up photo for reference. Thank you!


 

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04-17-21, 04:11 PM
Pilot Dane
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Your house's drain piping can't take the water away fast enough. First I would snake the line to make sure it's not partially clogged.
 
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Old 04-15-21, 07:52 PM
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Yes, replace the trap. Its quite possible more will be involved... a little ABS will need to be cut and possibly a new sink tailpiece. Things could leak if the connections aren't clean... so replacing with new clean parts will ensure that it operates problem free.
 
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Old 04-16-21, 05:23 AM
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Definitely replace the trap. I wouldn't worry so much about when you notice the leaks. The important part is that you caught the leak and can fix it before you have a bigger mess on the floor.


Just an FYI about tee's and wye's on a vertical drain pipe.
 
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Old 04-16-21, 10:20 AM
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I'd definitely start with just replacing the trap.

But the fact that you're getting water in the trap from a sink above does imply that there's likely a partial clog somewhere below the slab. I personally wouldn't worry about it until it starts backing up into the basement sink, but you could definitely snake it now and see if you can clear it up.

Snaking is always easier when you have a clog and can see/prove when you've cleared the clog. But there's no harm in snaking out the drain pipe and seeing if you feel/see anything that needs clearing.
 
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Old 04-17-21, 12:19 PM
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update

Thanks for all the help, I did replace the drain trap and am still dealing with some the fittings on them leaking a bit, so I'm tightening those a bit more to see if that will help. In the meantime, when I run the washing machine that is next to the utility sink and floor drain, I seem to get water coming up from the floor drain. I have no idea why this is happening. Any suggestions or things I should look into?


Floor drain putting out water during washing machine cycle.
 
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Old 04-17-21, 04:11 PM
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Your house's drain piping can't take the water away fast enough. First I would snake the line to make sure it's not partially clogged.
 
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Old 04-19-21, 08:53 PM
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update and question

Thanks Pilot Dane and everyone else, here's an update. I took a drain snake to the floor drain, but after several attempts, just could not get it to go down the drain further than a foot. I ended up opening up the clean-out plug (top left of photo) and put the snake down there. I ended up going down about 15 ft and came back with a bunch of black, smelly, viscous goop on the entire length of the snake. Any thoughts on what that was?

I cleaned the snake, tightened up the clean-out plug (which was pretty loose when I first removed it) and poured some water directly down the floor drain, and in the utility sink, and ran the washing machine (which is how I first noticed the problem, it drains into the utility sink), all three tests went okay and I didn't have any back flow from the floor drain.

Should I worry about the black goop? Do I need to call a professional to clear out and get down the floor drain? I had it professionally done a few years ago (1950's house for the record) and they cleared out roots and other debris.

Thanks again for all the help, the information I'm learning is really great, but the growing confidence in myself is invaluable. All the best!

 
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Old 04-20-21, 05:25 AM
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Having it professionally done is an option. They could use a longer auger and also jet the pipes and send a camera down to look for problems... things you likely can't do,
 
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Old 04-20-21, 07:29 AM
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Make sure no gutter drains are connected to the sewer system.
 
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Old 04-20-21, 09:56 AM
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The black gunk is probably grease from the kitchen that's turned into all sorts of yuckiness. Sometimes the problem with grease blockages is the snake pokes a hole through it, but doesn't fully clear it. You might need a snake with a larger head on it.

But as long as everything is running well now, I personally wouldn't bother having a pro come out. But the next time it does clog, it might be worth it to get a bigger snake down the pipe and possibly camera for roots again.
 
 

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