Replacing hose sillcock - threaded?


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Old 05-04-21, 11:10 AM
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Replacing hose sillcock - threaded?

Is the left connection going to my hose bibb threaded or soldered? I think it is threaded. If it is threaded, what kind of wrench should I use on the copper pipe? I tried channel locks and a pipe wrench (with vise grips on the connector), but it didn't work. The space I am working in is tight....I might need to make a bigger hole in the wall but I'm trying to avoid that. If you look closely the sillcock end is flared going into the brass connector.

If I had a 2nd person they could turn it from outside while I hold the connector (assuming it is threaded).

 
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Old 05-04-21, 01:19 PM
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You have a combo frost proof sillcock. It could have been installed with a 1/2" female fitting on the copper pipe and then just screwed on or it could be soldered directly on the 1/2" copper pipe.

Yours is soldered directly to the pipe. There is nothing to unscrew. It needs to be cut or sweated off with a torch.
 
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Old 05-04-21, 01:46 PM
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I agree. Your sillcock is soldered. You could try unsoldering but a second person outside to pull & wiggle would be a big help as you heat the connection with a torch. Then you would insert your new sillcock and see where it ends up and determine if you can solder it right back onto the pipe or if you need to cut or extend the pipe. It's common sense but you would be using a torch in a confined area so you would need to control what you hit with the torch and be careful not to set something on fire.

If you choose to cut instead of desoldering it looks like you have a duct right behind the pipe which will make cutting right at the end of the spigot difficult. It might be easier to cut 4-6" further to the right. Then when installing the replacement you might need to add a short section of pipe.
 
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Old 05-04-21, 02:23 PM
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Thanks for the responses. I was totally looking at it wrong not being familiar with these. I thought the connection was to the left of the brass but the brass is part of the sillcock where I can clearly see that soldered into the copper pipe.
 
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Old 05-04-21, 03:20 PM
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I second what the other guys said about yours being soldered. Just in the last hour or so I inspected my connection to see how I installed mine years ago (because mine leaks and I canít stop it). My connection looks exactly like your pic in post #1. The threads are there as an option to connect the valve into a female threaded connection instead of soldering as Pjmax pointed out.

In your case the solder option was used (like I did, I guess I liked the solder option better). As the guys said you can unsolder or cut - and it would be helpful if some were outside to wiggle it out as you heated if you go the unsolder route. I was just scratching my head trying to figure out if I want to unsolder or cut, and if I unsolder how would I do it because itís just me here by myself.

Iím thinking maybe you could grab that knurled part with channel locks with one hand and heat the solder joint with the other hand, and as the joint heats wiggle the valve off with the channel locks. Then the old excess solder could be cleaned off of the end of the pipe. I think Iím going to try that myself but maybe the other guys would think that wouldnít work very well. But I guess if that doesnít work then instead the pipe could be cut and thatís sure to work.

But as Pilot Dane says you have to be careful with a torch in a confined area (I think maybe I wish I gone the threaded route Ėlol, not really, I like solder connections better and apparently I didnít burn the house down last time).

Iíve seen pretty good advice to keep a bucket of water and a fire extinguisher on hand when you solder in confined places. I always do that and fortunately never needed them. Maybe you could do that also if you solder Ė not that a problem is very likely, but it always makes me feel better and might also do the same for you.

Good luck!

(come do mine when you are finished Ė lol)
 
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Old 05-05-21, 04:24 AM
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If soldering in a cavity like that where I may be hitting wood with the torch, I have a set of leathers and fiberglass mats to protect flammable items (but that's a bit specialized and most won't have them). You can also use a spray bottle to thoroughly wet anything flammable in the area. Don't worry about getting the pipe wet. A few seconds under the torch will dry it off. The water will evaporate away in a day so there isn't a concern about mold or mildew.
 
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Old 05-05-21, 05:20 AM
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An old piece of ceramic tile wedged behind the pipe will also protect against fire.
 
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Old 05-05-21, 09:09 AM
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