can PVC piping be reduced?


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Old 01-05-22, 09:10 AM
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can PVC piping be reduced?

I am in the process of repainting my laundry room (houses washer, dryer, furnace, & water heater). The attached photo shows the PVC pipe plumbing at the point where water enters the home. The original plumbing was copper and did not follow the winding path shown in the photo. To keep this post short, I won't explain why the original copper pipes were replaced with PVC. Briefly stated, the change was related to a potential addition of a water softener, but plans changed and a water softener was not installed.

The PVC piping was installed by technicians who would have installed the water softener, had one been installed. The PVC piping actually touches the wall and it is a nuisance to try to work around it when painting. And, that's what I'd like to change. I've never installed or modified PVC pipes. So, I'm wondering whether I could cut out the piping that runs up along the wall and connect the pipes back together without all the excess piping. In other words, I'd like to get the piping away from the wall. If a water softener is installed in the future, the piping can then be modified/extended as needed.

I imagine pipes could be cut with a hack saw or some type of power tool. Then, the open pipe ends could be connected together with elbows and a short section of pipe, bonded together with a special adhesive. Does this sound feasible?

 
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Old 01-05-22, 09:14 AM
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Yes, the piping can be redone. It's quite easy. Your piping appears to be CPVC and not PVC so make sure you get the correct glue and fittings.
 
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Old 01-05-22, 09:15 AM
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Yes, what you want to do can be done easily.
 
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Old 01-05-22, 09:22 AM
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Ah, I took a closer look and realized my piping is CPVC, Thanks for that info.
 
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Old 01-05-22, 09:53 AM
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I see that the outer diameter of my piping is about 7/8". So, I guess the inner diameter is 1/2". I believe I need to know the inner diameter when buying fittings. Is that right?

As I see it, I'd need to cut the pipes somewhere between or near the black lines shown in the attached photo. And then, I'd need to spread those pipe ends apart enough to get two elbow couplings and a short straight piece of pipe between the two elbows. Does this make sense?

Edit: I imagine the pipes should be practically perfectly parallel to get couplings to fit properly. But, spreading those ends apart enough to two elbow couplings and a short straight piece of pipe between the two elbow is not going to leave the pipes parallel, as I see it. Is this going to be a problem?

 

Last edited by dderolph; 01-05-22 at 10:24 AM.
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Old 01-05-22, 11:01 AM
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I have some CPVC in my house and I think most CPVC is also CTS (Copper Tubing Size). If you look at this chart an O.D. of 7/8 would mean your CPVC pipe is 3/4. I think that makes sense since most distributions through the house are 3/4 and then branches to individual fixtures (e.g. sinks, etc.) are 1/2. So I think you would buy 3/4 fittings. They are made to go over a 7/8 O.D. pipe, i.e., go over a 3/4 CTS pipe.

Dont forget to use the primer with the CPVC cement. HomeDepot etc. will have the cement and primer clearly labeled for CPVC.

The CPVC cuts easily and you can get a cheap tubing cutter at HomeDepot that would do a nice square cut.

I cant tell from here how to do the cut, and Im no expert anyway. But if the pipes are close maybe you have to do a couple of turns to build a loop if the pipes wont spread apart far enough.






 
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Old 01-05-22, 11:05 AM
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You have 1/2" which has an outside diameter of .84" (pretty close to 7/8").

The pipe is flexible so you should be able to make your changes without trouble. Before cutting anything imagine how the piping will go back together to make sure it can be done. In your case I would glue two 90 fittings together with a short piece of pipe between. Then when you install it onto your existing piping it will slide straight onto the two pipes.
 
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Old 01-05-22, 11:56 AM
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As others have said, you can definitely do what your plan is.
I'd also consider cutting the pipes at the bottom of your pic, right where the pipe comes out of the meter. Elbow down, through a new valve, and into the pipe going to the rest of the house. Much cleaner and fewer bends/fittings.

I'd personally also use a brass valve instead of a PVC valve for longevity. Attached with a pair of male-threaded cpvc fittings.

But if I'm over complicating your plans... feel free to stick with yours!
 
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Old 01-05-22, 12:13 PM
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@Dane

Are you sure thats PVC and not CPVC. Im pretty sure PVC is not allowed for water distribution in the home although I think Ive seen it in the past. Or is that CPVC but not CTS CPVC so PVC sizes apply. Never really got that straight.
 
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Old 01-05-22, 04:34 PM
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Dane had said it was CPVC. Member confirmed it's CPVC.

CPVC is measured by OD - which makes its sizing similar to hard copper.
PVC is measured by ID - which makes its sizing similar to iron pipe.



 
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Old 01-06-22, 09:21 AM
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Most likely 3/4 cpvc piping. Turn off the water supply and drain off the pressure. Get a small pan and some rags handy. Take 2 sharkbite 90 degree elbows ( buy 1/2" and 3/4" just in case and return whichever you do not need).
Cut the pipe where you have marked them. Hacksaw works well. Hold the pipe firmly on the side you intend to keep. Parallel cuts and clean off any burrs from cutting. From the remaining pipe that you are removing, cut a short pipe, the measurement from pipe to pipe edge as they are situated now. Install the 2 elbows on the pipes and the short piece between the two.
No glue needed. No need to worry about the water in the pipes affecting the glue. The elbows will swivel as needed for perfect alignment and you are done.
When installing the sharkbite, it will slip onto the pipe about 3/4 of an inch. It is good to mark the pipe to see that the sharkbite has indeed slipped onto the pipe. You may also want to purchase a sharkbite removal tool. It's a small plastic "C" shaped thing that aides in removing the sharkbite. Just in case you are not sure.
Quick and easy


 
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Old 01-06-22, 06:27 PM
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Hi everyone. Yes, I now believe the pipes are 3/4 diameter on the inside. I haven't done the cutting yet. I did buy 2 elbows and a short straight pipe to go between the elbows. And, I bought some cement for CPVC. I had not read the post by dan0661, so I did not buy sharkbite-type parts.

I believe I have several options for doing the cutting. I have a hack saw but will probably opt for one of the power tool options. The latter includes an oscillating tool, a jigsaw, and a reciprocating saw.



 
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Old 01-06-22, 08:11 PM
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Oscillating tool.
 
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Old 01-07-22, 04:03 AM
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Exchange out those fitting and get the SharkBite's. You'll be glad you did.
Dry fit everything first before you glue anything.
 
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Old 01-07-22, 10:43 AM
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You really don't need a power tool to cut CPVC. Look for things that look like garden pruning shears (usually have a red handle) at the hardware store. They cut cleanly, leaving no burrs inside the pipe for debris to collect on.

If you use a hacksaw or power tool, deburr the inside of the pipe with a pocket knife or similar.
 
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Old 01-07-22, 12:19 PM
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The SharkBite fittings I've seen so far on Home Depot's website are brass fittings, not PVC or CPVC.
 
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Old 01-07-22, 12:28 PM
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But they are compatible with use of PVC/CPVC. And there in fact some plastic SharkBite's.
 
 

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