Septic to sewage conversion?


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Old 01-07-22, 05:12 AM
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Septic to sewage conversion?

Just a couple of questions regarding the issue for someone who knows the ins and outs.

Background: We're on well and septic. City has been talking for several years about starting to convert the large number of septic properties to sewer and city water. Not going to happen real soon, but our particular neighborhood has been listed as possibly at the head of the line. There is water and sewer at both ends of our block and on parallel streets two blocks over in both directions, i.e. there are three streets surrounded by available utilities.

I'm just curious about the mechanics of the conversion on our end. I know where the tank is and the main line from the house to it. Question: How do they go about diverting the main line to a sewer connection? Cut the line between the house and septic and reroute around the tank? They throw around some big numbers that we'll be billed for the city part of the project (with options for long-term financing), but have never mentioned if those numbers include the new line on the homeowner's property TO the sewer.

Second question: If the new property waste line is NOT included in their numbers, about what would that run to install? Yes, I know it varies based on the area, but just generally.
 
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Old 01-07-22, 05:22 AM
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The answer is... you pay. Many municipalities instate mandatory connection fees when annexing new properties. As for the specifics of how it's done, that comes down to the specifics of your situation. Where they run the sewer mains and where your septic is located have a big impact.

In my most recent conversion they ran the new sewer down the street. The house's septic was in the back. So th house had to have it's drain piping rerouted (replaced) to redirect the waste from exiting the rear of the house to going out the front to meet the new sewer connection. In another area of town the city ran the sewer line along the property line between the back of a row of houses. Since everyone's septic was in back it made connecting a straight shot.
 
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Old 01-07-22, 08:04 AM
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When we were annexed into the city, we changed from septic to sewer. We went to city hall and paid a tap fee. We received a small sign to place at the curb at the spot where we wanted the sewer tap located. On our property, the line between the house and septic tank was cut. The septic tank side of the line was plugged. The house side of the line was diverted to the sewer tap and connected after the city constructed their side of the new line. I did the line construction on my side of the tap and the city plumbing inspector was very picky about the proper slope of the line. Have not had any problems with the line in 50 years. Hope this helps. Good luck with your project. (Our current tap fee is $1,550.00)
 
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Old 01-07-22, 09:07 AM
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You need to plan the routing of the line exiting your house and let the city know about that as soon as the subject of sewer conversion is started.. The slope of the line exiting your house is critical. In addiiton the line leaving your house may have to jog sideways (parallel to the street) many feet to go around the corner of the house and then turn 90 degrees towards the street and your marked sewer tap location. This necessitates more vertical wiggle room for slope. Sometimes the city has to calculate the depth of the new sewer to be compatible with all of the various house main drain lines. Sometimes the slope works out only if you cut through your driveway or stone wall as opposed to go the long way around the other side of the house.

It is not a problem to have to put a U in a French drain or weeping tile system to allow the main drain to have a new straight run under the basement floor.and out the foundation, although a cleanout (for the weeping tile) should be installed at that crossing.
 
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Old 01-08-22, 08:35 AM
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Thanks guys. A little more info I should have included: This is a new install for the city, so they'll be running a sewer line down the road somewhere. Fortunately, the norm here is front yard tank and field, so appears it will be pretty simple as compared to a back yard situation or weird location. Only jog would be around the existing tank, but there'll be some tree roots involved out near front property line, a palm and a pine. They're talking in the $10K+ range per parcel plus whatever we'll have to pay a plumber for the run from the house and, I'm assuming, a last pump out of the old tank. One of the reasons we finally got around to combining our parcels; only one hookup charge. Here's what it looks like:





 
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Old 01-08-22, 08:43 AM
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And no basement to worry about (this is Florida; what's a basement?). The main line out of the house is only about a foot under surface as I recall. Not sure about the elevation drop to center of road, maybe 4'.

I'll update the thread when & if they ever actually get going on the project.
 
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Old 01-08-22, 08:52 AM
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Just remember to tell the city where you want the tap before they build the line in the street. Otherwise, they will make the decision about the tap location.
 
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Old 01-08-22, 11:04 AM
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this is Florida; what's a basement?
I believe it would be called an indoor pool
I hit water with a post hole digger at the place I had outside of Orlando.
I know I'm behind the times but $10k seems like a lot for connecting to city sewage
 
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Old 01-09-22, 11:38 AM
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Not so much the actual hooking up, but it's based on the new line running down the length of the street. Fair number of vacant lots still on the block and those folks are going to get a shock if they haven't kept up on local news. I'm sure some of them are out of state.

Keeping an ear to the ground so I'll know when they are actually starting. Could still be years away knowing how slowly the gears of government work.
 
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Old 01-09-22, 05:30 PM
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I'm assuming, a last pump out of the old tank.
To abandon a septic tank, does it need to be crushed/filled? Or can it simply be pumped and abandoned like that?
(Asking the others around here, I've only abandoned one, and the top cracked, so it wasn't stable as-is.
 
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Old 01-10-22, 02:38 PM
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I haven't heard that mentioned, but I THINK it's just pump and abandon.
 
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Old 01-11-22, 02:28 AM
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It's probably location specific. I've heard of folks having to remove, crush and/or fill [with gravel/dirt] the septic tank when switching to city sewage.
 
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Old 01-11-22, 04:12 AM
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Next county over (my primary business location, county line is 5 minutes from house) has been doing some large scale conversions in some areas and I can't say I've seen a single yard being torn up as signs of a tank removal; we may be the same.
 
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Old 01-11-22, 09:40 AM
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I haven't heard that mentioned, but I THINK it's just pump and abandon.
I'm certainly not trying to create more work for you!
 
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