Help with ideas on PVC fix


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Old 05-12-22, 06:18 AM
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Help with ideas on PVC fix

The old ball valve on my irrigation feed was corroded and no longer worked, so I cut the pipe that is embedded in the ground and runs to the solenoids about 15 feet away and thought I would just pop it back together with a union afterwards. What I didn't consider was that both ends of the pipe are fixed - one in the wall and one in the ground, and I have limited options for a union placement. I got to this point (see pics) and realized that I would have to tighten the leg with the union in (screwed into the ball valve) and have it probably more precise than I think I can easily do in order to have it fit. I only have about a 1/4 of play in the pipe coming up from the ground. Currently, all the fittings are screwed - except the new union I am considering.
However, I just read a recent previous post where someone was warning about PVC unions, so that also added to my concern about my current plan. Thoughts much appreciated!



 
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Old 05-12-22, 09:12 AM
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I am one of those people who don't like unions.

What is the gray fitting between your T and threaded into the house's brass fitting? Are both ends threaded so you can at least rotate the T a bit more to align with the pipe in the ground?

Your threaded fittings make repair a bit more difficult. I would dig. There is probably a 90į fitting down there. Cut the pipe in the horizontal after the 90į. Then replace from there up to your new T. You can thread into the bottom of your T come straight down to a glued 90į and use a union into your existing underground pipe. If your underground pipe is deep enough there could be enough bend in the pipe to allow using a glued coupling fitting.
 
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Old 05-12-22, 09:28 AM
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LIke this?

Thanks Dane,
The grey fitting is a PVC close nipple. Yeah, they didn't really plan for any future repairs, did they?
Not sure I understand your description - are you saying put the union horizontal and burried below ground level?

 
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Old 05-12-22, 09:29 AM
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I'll be the decenter here.

I have used many PVC unions over the years and have never had one leak. So IMO they are a durable part and essential to build up a plumbing system so that it can be taken apart without having to cut them up, especially when you have serviceable parts like valves, meters etc.

You have to install them snugged up and also have to be sure you don't glue them up such that you can get glue running down the inside.

I would have no concerns plumbing that up with a union, taking good measurements would be easy to fix.
 
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Old 05-12-22, 10:16 AM
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Yes, cut where you indicate on your drawing. Then you only need about an inch of flex in the pipe to allow you to get a coupling glued in place. Or, screw your vertical tightly into the T. Then you can fuss until you get the horizontal to the right length to use a union. Glue the 90į onto your horizontal section (that's the exact correct length). Then last glue the top part of the 90 to your vertical pipe.
 
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Old 05-12-22, 10:42 AM
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Iím not a plumbing expert for sure, so you have to take this with a grain of salt. PD and Marq know more than I do for sure.

But I donít see why you couldnít use a PVC repair coupling in this case. I havenít done that much with PVC but I donít use a union if it is very unlikely that it will ever need to be opened. To me itís not worth putting in a union that has a chance of leaking, in a place where it is very unlikely that it will need to be opened. That new ball valve probably isnít going to need replacement for a very long time Ė if ever.

There are telescoping repair couplings for cases where the 2 ends to be joined are fixed as in your case.

 
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Old 05-12-22, 02:56 PM
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Thanks everyone, I picked up all the parts I could possible require for the options presented, and then attempted my initial plan, seeing as the repair is in an area I see often and can see if it leaks. Carefully cut the vertical leg to the measured distance and (HOLY CRAP) it worked! So far, so good, no leaks and no major strain on that connection either. If I run into problems later, I will attempt your other solutions. Your ideas were very much appreciated!
 
 

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