Weird floor drain issue


  #1  
Old 10-10-22, 06:08 PM
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Weird floor drain issue

This last weekend I had a smell in my laundry room. I removed my floor drain cover and water was up to the top ready to breach the drain. I put a hose in the drain to flush and it would take as much water as I could put in it without the level rising. That floor drain is the end of the run before it goes outside to the house trap. Typically I have 6Ē from water level in the floor drain, to the top.

In the past, I was told that my house trap could back up into my floor drain because of how it was plumbed. I occasionally flush that drain and add Clorox or I get sewer fleas. My garage floor drain, thatís at the same elevation, did not have any backup.

Today I checked and the water level was normal again. I flushed with water and it took all that I put in it. Throughout this issue, Iíve had no drainage issues. Iím wondering if the issue was at the street and not in my home? If it were a restriction, I wouldnít have been able to add water without the level rising.

About 15 years ago I had about 60í of my sewer line dug up and replaced, tree roots had clogged it, that line is 7í deep. We removed the offending tree and added a clean out. That wasnít 100% of my outside line, but it was most of it. My yard is pool table flat, I donít think my lines have much slope. These homes were originally septic and later converted to city sewage

Anyone have any explanations of this issue.
 

Last edited by LyndMc; 10-10-22 at 07:10 PM.
  #2  
Old 10-10-22, 08:13 PM
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You should have a 1/4" per foot of slope based on 70' length.

A trap outside the home... are you sure ?
I was aware they used them on storm drain lines but not on basic sewer lines.
Is this an older home ?

A trap will not stop any flooding. If the street was backed up it would come out in your house regardless of traps. Only a one way sewer flapper would stop returning water.

My garage floor drain, that’s at the same elevation, did not have any backup.
If they are connected to the same line.... they do the same exact thing.
If one is up to the top so must the other one.
Maybe the garage is not connected ?
 
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Old 10-10-22, 08:53 PM
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Trap outside, thatís my assumption, there is an outside vent about 8í from the inside floor drain. The home was built in 1972. The garage floor drain does drain normally. Being as close to the laundry room floor drain, I assumed they were connected.

Yes, itís weird that the garage drain wasnít at the same water level.
 
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Old 10-14-22, 05:29 PM
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A trap outside the home... are you sure ?
I've seen a lot of older homes with house traps in the yard and even a few plumbers who wanted to install them on new sewer lines up into the 1980s. In recent years I can't say for sure, but when I see older homes get new sewer laterals installed they do bring a 4" PVC vertical to the surface and cap it. I assume as a cleanout, but I wouldn't want that obnoxious looking thing in my front yard.
​​​​​​​ The garage floor drain does drain normally. Being as close to the laundry room floor drain, I assumed they were connected.
I doubt your garage floor drain is connected to the sanitary sewer.
 
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Old 10-14-22, 06:04 PM
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So hereís the latest. The next day I removed the floor drain cover and the level was back down to normal 🤷‍♂️. I flushed more water down through it and it took it no problem. The issue has not reoccurred since!

i had a professional scheduled and he pushed me back a day. By the time he was due to come the next day, I called and cancelled. So far it has not reoccurred. They are replacing all of the sewer covers in the roadway not far from my home. Im wondering if the issue was the system and not my home?

Im keeping an eye on it just to be sure.
 
  #6  
Old 01-12-23, 11:06 AM
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UPDATE: So here it is over 2 months later, and it happened again, only worse. I had a black puddle in my laundry room and garage. I called a professional and he snaked my laundry and garage floor drains. He found a clog about 6' beyond my laundry floor drain. He then went out and pulled the cap off of my cleanout and we flushed the toilets and ran a bunch of water. He said that the flow was flying so he is confident that it's all good. So far, no further issues!
 
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Old 01-12-23, 11:55 AM
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A trap outside the home... are you sure?
For what it's worth, Philadelphia and Pittsburgh still use curb traps. It's a trap at the street with a house-side vent at the sidewalk. There's even a 'Philadelphia Vent' that's used. In my area, most were installed 80+ years ago with a combination of clay and cast iron, so many of them are needing to be replaced (at the homeowner's cost of course).

But they are still required for all new construction as well. I can't say what the benefit is though, other than "it's the way we've always done it".
 
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Old 01-12-23, 02:42 PM
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Zorfdt.... yes, I have one of those Philadelphia vents. Back before I had most of my plastic line dug up and replaced due to roots, my plumber had me go out there with a wet mop and put it in there and churn the mop like I was churning butter. This was to create pressure and push air down the line to clear a minor clog.... lol, and it worked!

That vent is now under a deck stair but still can be accessed. There's another vent or cleanout about 4' away from that too. Unfortunately, that second one is now under the bottom step of my deck and only accessible if I unscrew the step on my Azek plastic decking. Hopefully I never have to get to it. My home originally had a septic tank and that second access lines up with where the abandoned septic tank is in my yard.
 
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Old 01-20-23, 06:49 PM
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But they are still required for all new construction as well. I can't say what the benefit is though, other than "it's the way we've always done it".
I had a plumber tell me many years ago that house traps in the front yard used to be required because there were so many homes that when plumbing was first put in the traps and venting wasn't done to code....if they existed at all.
 
 

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