unclog corrugated pipe underground


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Old 07-27-23, 11:33 AM
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unclog corrugated pipe underground

I have a 4 inch corrugated pipe that runs from my floor drains in the basement. the sanitary sewer is above the basement floor. It seems to have clogged and won't drain. I ran a tape up the end outside in the storm drain and it went about 25 feet before hitting a blockage. I used a fish tape because the storm drain is too narrow to get the rat into it. I ran a heavy manual rat in from inside the floor sump and it goes about 50 feet before stopping. I am thinking that maybe tree roots got into it or it collapsed. I am leaning toward tree roots as it goes right around a pine tree. it there a way to use an electric or some other kind of drain machine to clear this out without tearing up the corrugated pipe? thanks in advance

frank
 
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Old 07-27-23, 11:42 AM
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I'm not a fan of corrugated pipe for this exact reason. They are difficult to snake well and tend to catch everything going through them.

I would probably invest in a snake camera, either have a plumber out or get a cheap one online, so you can see exactly what you're dealing with. I don't know of any good way to snake the pipes ensuring they won't break - but at least if you find the clog, you can check the pipe afterwards to see if it needs to be replaced (hopefully outside in an easy-to-dig area).
 
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Old 07-27-23, 11:44 AM
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without tearing up the corrugated pipe?
They make jet tips for pressure washers if you can get down stream, not sure how well they will work with roots.




The cutting heads they use on the auger style snakes I'd be concerned what it would do to the pipes.
 
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Old 07-27-23, 02:23 PM
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What's a rat?

I hate corrugated pipe. It clogs easily and is easily damaged.

I would not run a drain auger in the pipe, especially if it has a cutter head (what you need for roots). It's very possible for it to catch on the corrugations and damage the pipe. A jetter is good for grease and clogs but the power (commercial, high power) to cut roots will likely destroy the pipe and a residential pressure washer can't generate the pressure needed to cut anything bigger than small roots.

I might pay for a plumber to run a camera down the line so you can see what the problem is and not guess. I would make sure to get someone who's camera has a locator head so you can mark the path of the pipe in case you need to cut open the floor.
 
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Old 07-27-23, 03:40 PM
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I hate corrugated pipe. It clogs easily and is easily damaged.
In defence, my corrugated drain pipe is going on 17 years old with no issues, I now question the OP's original question. If you have solid pipe, like I do, how are roots ever going to get in there?
 
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Old 07-28-23, 07:02 AM
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If you have solid pipe, like I do, how are roots ever going to get in there?
​​​​​​​Roots could collapse the pipe rather than entering it.
 
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Old 07-28-23, 08:24 AM
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Or it could be just a simple blockage due to debris!!
 
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Old 07-28-23, 09:30 AM
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"If you have solid pipe, like I do, how are roots ever going to get in there?"
Corrugated pipe is easily cracked or damaged. Also it does not provide for water tight connections between pipe sections and fittings. All it takes is a slight leak and roots will seek out the water and home in on the tiniest gap and then grow and expand the opening. Also, I've seen contractors use the wrong pipe. It could be perforated making the job easy for roots.
 
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Old 07-29-23, 05:22 AM
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I did not use the perforated pipe and it seems I got all excited about noting. tried using the rat(drain snake). It did not work, over the next couple of days I noticed the water level in the sump was going down very slowly. I took my garden hose and pushed it as far as i could down the pipe, stuffed the end with rags and turned the water on. I let it run and expected it to come backing up, and when I saw a little water coming back out I shoved the rags in tighter and after that it started running again, so all is good again. thanks for all the help and suggestions.

frank
 
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