sulfur water?


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Old 07-16-01, 06:13 PM
sleeper
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when you first turn on the faucets the water has a sewage smell to it but is ok after it runs for a bit,we have been told it is sulfur water. what can you do about it?
 
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Old 07-16-01, 08:44 PM
J
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I have done some research in water purification here are some things to get you started.
Water purification depends on how much you want to do (the whole house or just drinking water) Once you decide that call up Culligan or someone like them and ask them what they sell to remove sulfer. One thing you will need to know is the level of any contaiminets in the water usually measured in PPM. Then the proper equipment can be found to remove enough to an acceptable level. They often will test the water for "free" hoping to sell something. I have seen some water with sulfur and it is like you described and I know a distiller will remove it (for drinking purposes)
 
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Old 07-17-01, 02:27 PM
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We have 2 households on the same well pump. So whatever we need to do will have to be done to both. Is there any way to take care of the problem at the source, as in the well itself? Maybe a filtration system of some type for the well pump. I'm not familiar with these type things, and am only making guesses here. I would like to do this as inexpensive as possible. Thanks....
 
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Old 07-17-01, 02:53 PM
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I am not that familiar with this but I can say yes there are treatment systems that do whole house filteration but they are usually expensive but in this case they may be desirable. You might also speak to a well driller about options to take care of the issue although well drilling is expensive and may not be an option they may have ideas to help.

 
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Old 07-17-01, 05:23 PM
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Here in SW Fla our well pumps do not directly pressurize the house system. The well pump maintains water in an "aeration" tank that dissipates the sulfur smell and the house pump draws from this tank. Our tank is fiberglass and holds maybe 100 gals. There is a float to signal the well pump it's time to top off the tank. Water is pumped to the top of the tank (which has vents around the perimeter) where it exits through what are essentially upside down sprinkler heads (mine has six in a square array). If you're standing near the tank when the well pump kicks on there's a noticeable rotten egg smell in the immediate area (which only lasts while the well pump is running). There is no noticeable odor to the water in the house. Although there's no odor to the water, the taste leaves much to be desired, so we use bottled for drinking.
Use of an aeration tank would of course not be feasible in the colder climates unless it was insulated. Secondary benefit of the tank is that it acts as a settling tank for sand, etc.
 
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Old 07-18-01, 05:50 AM
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Sulfur Water

The two most common ways to eliminate the sulfur smell from well water are aereation and chlorination. Both of these can be done at the well itself.

AEREATION: This is generally done by feding a small quantity of water through a venturi back to the well bore. Various companies produce this equipment and you would need to check with water conditioning dealers, well drillers, and water system contractors in your area to locate any who might sell or install these devices.

An additional benefit from an aereator is that it will promote the removal of any iron in the water, though this will require the addition of a filter.

An aereator will do little to remove a pronounced bad taste in the water caused by hydrogen sulfide or any other minerals.

CHLORINATION: This is accomplished at the well head through the use of either a chemical feed pump or a unit that injects chlorine tablets into the well bore. Each of these devices is activated whenever the well pump operates.

Each of these systems are readily available from those who work in the drinking water industry or who supply equipment to them. This includes companies such as Sears, Lowes, various farm supply stores and the like.

While simple in concept, this system requires more maintenance in terms of insuring the equipment has a steady supply of product with which to inject into the well.

In addition, the chlorine smell or taste may be objectionable and you may want to consider flitration to remove same. The proper filter is one that uses activated charcoal and is commonly called a "taste and odor" filter. I would suggest that if you wish to use chlorination and want to filter the water for your entire home, you consider using a bed type filter, and not one that uses cartridges.

Again, the addition of chlorine to your well may also improve the water quality by allowing the removal of other minerals, particularly iron, Again this assumes you install a filter.

Chlorination will not soften your water.

Whew, this got a little longer than I intended. Hope it helps.
 
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Old 07-19-01, 05:39 AM
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Sulfer Odor

I had a similar problem with my well water 15 years ago. The water smelled like rotten eggs. My well contractor told me that it was iron bacteria and he suggested that I shock the well by taking the cap off the wellhead and pouring a gallon of household bleach into the well and then taking a garden hose and recirculating the water for about an hour. The water tasted like chlorine for about a week and then both the chlorine taste and sulfer odor disappeared completely never to return.
 
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Old 07-22-01, 05:47 PM
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thanks folks for all your help.
 
 

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