Is this something I need to worry about it?


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Old 06-12-24, 12:04 PM
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Is this something I need to worry about it?

My bathtub was clogged and so I use a powered auger through the overflow hole. Apparently it looks like my overflow hole doesn't go straight down but comes out at the tub drain. Now I saw this white slip plastic washer down in the tub drain. I pulled it out of the tub drain as shown in the screen shot below. Where could this washer came from and is this a cause for concern? I was thinking that maybe it was between this silver metal here and the pvc tube. If so, how do I remove this silver metal here and replace the plastic washer?



Many thanks in advance!
 
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Old 06-12-24, 01:29 PM
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No way did you get that plastic ring out the tub drain shown in the photo. It appears the auger destroyed some of the overflow/drain plumbing. You need to get access to bottom and/or drain end of tub to investigate and repair.
 
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Old 06-12-24, 01:44 PM
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That nylon washer is only used with removable fittings.... like p traps.
Typically tub drains aren't installed with adjustable/nut type fittings.
If there is.... you would have access to it thru the wall behind.... especially if it's a closet.

The arrow points to where that nylon gasket is used.
 
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Old 06-13-24, 11:34 AM
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Thank you for all the help. Here's what mine looks like. I have looked around on the Internet and usually the pvc pipe that goes down to the sewer system is coming from the overflow but in my case, it's from the tub drain. Is this the wrong installation? I guess this is why I've made the wrong assuming and used the auger via the overflow opening instead of the tub drain pipe.



 
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Old 06-14-24, 03:43 PM
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I worked as a plumber in San Francisco for 30 years. That's a perfectly legit waste/ovrflo - just not a configuration that is seen very often. However, simply from that picture, no way to tell if it's installed properly to the rest of the plumbing. Is that a picture of your problem drain?

That looks like a slip-joint gasket and it's hard to see how you would be able to bust one loose. If you did, as B...Bob said, your drain likely has serious problems.

In order to snake a W/O like this you need to remove the drain itself and run the snake straight down. Drains unscrew, either with a special tool or just put a hefty pair of needlenose pliers down to engage the cross bars and use a bar of some sort on the plier handles to turn the drain. There are several things that can go unpleasantly wrong when removing tub drains and it may be better to take a hacksaw blade and cut the crossbars out to open the drain to a snake.

You have the right idea, that clearing a tube drain requires actual snaking to approach good results. But note there is no way from info in the thread so far to say whether the drain was installed properly.

RJ
 
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Old 06-14-24, 04:24 PM
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Is that the actual picture from your tub ?
Is that shot from the basement ?
Is there a trap on the drain ?

If yes at least it's easy to work on.
I would not have recommended a powered snake thru a tub drain.
 
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Old 06-15-24, 06:55 AM
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Yes, this is an actual picture of my tub from the basement. I have drop ceiling tiles so at least I don't have to destroy drywalls to get to it; however, it's way up there so I will see if I can get at it. Another thing, if the washer is coming off from the overflow pipe, I don't think it's an immediate danger since we never use the tub for bath so the chance of water coming down from the overflow pipe is very slim. However, I'm not sure if this is a correct thinking.
 
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Old 06-15-24, 01:38 PM
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It looks like the gasket may have come from the overflow connection.
The only way it would leak is if the drain line below clogs or the tub overflows.
 
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Old 06-15-24, 07:45 PM
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When you get to working on the drain, it's a good idea to have everything you need, including a new waste/overflow, gaskets (and pipe fittings if you decide to change the configuration of your plumbing system to the more common one where the overflow pipe connects to the drain). You don't show the plumbing, but there needs to be a trap first thing after the tub drain and a vent through the roof right after that. It _should_ all be there, but... If not, that can cause problems from gurgling to sewer smells on up.

Tools needed:
- channel lock pliers that fit the slip joint nuts
- if there is not space to use pliers on a slip-joint nut, there is a specialty tool called a basin wrench - in this case you need the large version sized for slip-joint nuts, which is even more special
- a hefty pair of long nosed pliers and a short bar of some sort to remove the drain basket; or one of the special tools, a "smart dumbell" or an expending wrench - the "dumbell" is far more usable.
- something to cut the "tubular" making up the waste/overflow. If it's plastic, you could try a pipe cutter, but the plastic may flex so much that it would not cut; a hacksaw blade will do the job if you go slow and avoid getting frazzled and impatient. Or maybe one of the plastic cutters found in the box stores will work ok - don't know about those. If you go with brass, the expensive 17ga version is _much_ easier to work with and cut; with cheap brass, you can end up with the flexi-scrushy problem and might have to use the hacksaw blade anyway - it's not as easy as with plastic.

If you go with all plastic waste/overflow, you may be able to install the slip-joints with just hand tightening (_firmly_). The tub drain needs to be tightened with a wrench of some kind, regardless of material. Pipe dope, compatible with plastic if that's what you use. "Plumbers" putty, a very small film on the drain gasket (against the tub) helps the seal; too much and the gasket may get pushed around and leak. The drain gasket goes _under_ the tub on top of the w/o cup. Plastic slip-joints you can try with no pipe dope at all - sometimes works, sometimes not, but it's much cleaner and usually works if all the tubular is fitted nicely. With plastic, be careful about cross threading - much easier to mess up than with metal. When starting a nut, it can help to turn the nut backwards until you hear/feel a "click", the turn forward. DON'T glue anything with glue, caulk or anything similar. The connections are all designed to be pressure sealed, including the drain and if you glue anything (aside from your pvc or abs plastic plumbing pipes, if that's how your system is made up) you are setting yourself up for huge sorrow down the road. Cut and fit until the parts go together correctly.

Plumbing is not a place to cheap out or take short cuts. That gamble just doesn't pencil out.

RJ
 
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Old 06-16-24, 12:32 PM
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Awesome, thank you so much for all the tips and suggestions! I will be back if I have more questions.
 
 

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