need to raise my well--- too much silt


  #1  
Old 08-18-01, 03:50 PM
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Hi I am new to this forum and could use some help. Can someone give me a web site that might explain how to raise the end of my well ( the suction end). The well is 11 years old and 280 feet deep.
Our water pressure is very bad. We go thru a D-20 carbon filter about every 3 weeks to a month.
I was told that sediment has built up at the bottom of the well and every time the well cycles on... sediment is kicked up and sucked up into the system.
Thanks in advance for any help you might give.
 
  #2  
Old 08-18-01, 05:23 PM
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Pulling a deep well is a major job, and usually best left to pros with the proper equipment and expertise.
Raising the jet pump up may not solve the problem.
Have you talked with your local Health Department? They should be the ones that do well permits, and may be able to give you some insight about wells in the area, and what may have worked for others with a similar problem.
Also, they may be able to get you information from your State about wells.
I believe that you're using the right micron size filter (20) for sediment, and that may be all that you can do. You might check to see if there is a larger micron filter that would work to lessen the water flow restriction.
A 280' well may have a lot of weight, but you can assemble a very large tripod over it, with chains, and a chainfall hoist hanging from the tripod for pulling it (just DON'T drop it down after it's loose).
You could probably raise it and remove a section of pipe (probably 20'), if the Health Department thinks that this will help.
I don't know of a website on how to pull wells, but I've seen it done by pros (I'm not one).
Good Luck!

 
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Old 08-18-01, 05:46 PM
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thanks for the info

thank you for the info. I will give the H dept a call.
 
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Old 08-23-01, 09:38 AM
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My initial reaction was to provide details as to what may be wrong and some of the available cures. However the initial response was correct in that this is a job that would be best tackled by someone with experience and the proper equipment. There is a great deal of weight involved in your case and the possibility of injury to yourself or expensive damage to your well is high.

Besides talking with the sources mentioned, you might want to consider talking to some local well drillers or pump installation contractors.

Generally speaking, a well that produces setiment will require either repair or cleaning either by chemicals or mechanically. The determining factor is the type of setiment. This usually means whether is it dirt or some form of iron or other mineral contaminent.

The low water pressure may be the result of either a pump that has been improperly sized for your situation, or one that is now producing less because of wear or the build up of iron or other sediment in the pump.

The problem may also be the filter you mention. Generally, a single element cartridge filter for an entire home may reduce the overall pressure available. If there is a faucet or other outlet before the filter, and there is good flow and pressure there, I would suggest you consider replacing your current filter and installing a bed type filter that can be backwashed. As you might expect, these are generically called "sediment" filters. They are available with either manual or automatic backwash cycles.

You may wish to have the settings of your system's pressure switch checked as they may be set lower than you would like.

If you have a jet pump, you may want to consider changing to a submersible. This type of pump will deliver higher flow at greater pressures than will a jet pump. HOWEVER, if the well is producing sediment, increasing the flow may seriously make the problem worse.

Again, I seriously recommend you contact a professional.

 
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Old 08-23-01, 11:18 AM
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thanks for the advice. I will contact a pro. Hopefully it wont be costly.
 
 

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