galvanized pipe to pvc?


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Old 01-23-02, 09:07 PM
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galvanized pipe to pvc?

I have a 30 ft by 2.5in dia. galvanized waste pipe for a kitchen sink that runs the full span of my crawl space, it has recently started to leak and is badly coroded in a couple areas. I was wondering if I could replace this section of pipe with PVC? The issue is that the sections it connects to are galvanized pipe. Is there a proper method for connecting pvc to galvanized piping or is this a plumbing a no-no I am just trying to save some money since the estimate I received was around 500.00
Thanks
Tony
 
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Old 01-23-02, 09:12 PM
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Cut the section out and use rubber fernco couplings to make the transition between the two types of pipe..
 
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Old 01-24-02, 09:05 AM
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To answer your question, connecting pvc to galvanized is not a plumbing no-no - at least not that I know of. This is a relatively simple fix. Since you mention 2.5 in diameter, I assume you mean OD and this would be standard 2 inch dia schedule 40 pipe. Any well stocked home store (Home Depot) shuld carry 2 in PVC and all of the connectors you will need.

Cut the damaged section of galvanized pipe and unthread both ends from the first available threaded joints that are in good condition. You can buy 2 inch PVC and adapters that are threaded (male thread) on one end and have a female socket on the other. This material is very easy to work with - make square cuts, , champher the ends to remove burrs from the saw, be generous with the cleaner and glue and your set. Pipe supports should be provided about every 5 feet - PVC will sag with time, particularly when exposed to hot water. If there are any 90 degree elbows within your work area, these must be made up of two 45 degree elbows for ease in snaking out the drain line should it be necessary.
 
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Old 01-24-02, 09:17 AM
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If you can't unscrew the pipe out of the end fittings to use male adaptors, which 90% of the time, while working under a house, this is almost impossible, then use of fernco's is the best option.


Originally posted by Davef15
If there are any 90 degree elbows within your work area, these must be made up of two 45 degree elbows for ease in snaking out the drain line should it be necessary.
It is not a must to use two 45 degree elbows to make up a 90 elbow, in dwv drainage fittings, code allows the use of long turn 90 elbows, I have never had a problem cleaning out any laundry drain because of 90 degree elbows.
 
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Old 01-25-02, 09:01 AM
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Plumber 2000, you are correct. Our local code requires the use of long sweep 90's in DWV. However, sometimes these are not readily available in the local home stores. I learned the hard way you can't use an ordinary 90 - had to cut it out after the inspector rejected it. An acceptable alternative (at least for him) is two street 45's.
 
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Old 01-25-02, 09:08 AM
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If the LT 90's are not avail, then use of two 45 will make the 90 needed.

Or one St 45 and one reg 45 will make the 90 needed.

Shot turn 90's are for the venting part in the dwv system, and then there are vent 90's there are even sharper turns then the reg turn 90's, and used in the venting system only.
 
 

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