shallow well pressure


  #1  
Old 01-26-02, 12:51 PM
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Thumbs down shallow well pressure

I would like to increase the pressure in my house, I have a shallow well pump with a prv that kicks on at 25 lbs and kicks out at around 45 lbs...this seems low to me, so before I adjust it I thought I might ask. I have 1 inch lines to the pressure tank and to the water softener, then 3/4 to and from the water heater then reduced to 1/2 for all the fixtures, {I hate these new 'water saver' faucets! gimme back my skin wrinkling pressure we had as a kid!} can I hold better pressure with a larger pressure tank, or hooking 2 tanks in unison? What else can I try to do to maybe hold better pressure? Ive replaced all the galvanized with cpvc, and I still have quite a bit of copper pipe yet that seems to be in good shape. Is it just the faucets of today that slow the flow too much? Ive cleaned all the screens and aereators. Thanks for any advice!
 
  #2  
Old 01-26-02, 03:36 PM
toiletjockey
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For a shallow well jet pump thats about all you are going to get. Adding a larger tank or more tanks will not help water pressure. This will just give the pump more reserve inbetween pump cycles. About the only thing you could do is go to a submersible pump if your well would support it. Also me saying going to a bigger tank won't help is only right if you don't have at least 14 gal. draw down tank. Like a Welxtrol 202 for example average size for residentual use. To increase water pressure other than changing pumps would to remove flow restrictors from your faucets. If you would like more help or have more questions just holler! Glad to help as I hope this does.
 
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Old 01-27-02, 10:03 AM
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Thanks for your response! I do have a well-x-trol tank, it looks to be at least 14 gallons. I checked the air pressure in it when it was completely empty and it was 18 lbs, but when full{when the pump kicked out} it was 44 lbs. I increased the air pressure to 30lbs when the water pressure guage was at 30 lbs at the pump, which is where I have it set to kick on now. I also set the kick out pressure at 50 lbs, and the tank air pressure now reads 48 lbs when full. Is this a normal fluctuation in air pressure? Also,these flow restrictors you refered to, are they in the end of the spouts or in the catridges? I have great pressure from the garden hose I have attached to the pressure tank drain, I wish it were that strong at the faucets, especially in the shower. I took the cartidge out from the tub faucets thinking I could drill it out larger for more capacity, but that didnt look possible at all..any thoughts on that manner?
 
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Old 01-27-02, 11:35 AM
toiletjockey
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Your tank sounds like it good and your pressure will be different with and without water and it needs to be checked with no water for the reading that you need. And like I told you if you have your pump set to come on @ 30# air in the empty tank needs to be 2# less,so it would have 28#. It would always be 2# less than start up no matter where your pump starts.
For the flow restrictors they will be in the aerators on your kit and lavatory faucets. Your tub and or showers will be in the shower head itself.

Aerators..... you will have to unthread them from the end of your spout and on the backside of the aerator will be a flat looking washer or disc with a small hole in the center just pop it out. Usually a fork or a pocket knife will do and then put aerator back on.

Shower head.... again unthread shower head and on the back side you will find about the same thing as with the other faucets but some manufactures will incorporate the seal with the flow restrictor. Remove all of it if this is the case and just go to hardware store or plbg. shop and pick up a plain flat rubber seal or an "O" of the right size will also do don't forget to reseal the threads on the shower neck.

Something else that came to mind is if you have a whole house filter somewhere? If you do keep the filter changed often and don't use a charcoal filter or any filter less than 30-35 microns. These, especially a charcoal filter are very pressure robbing!!
 
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Old 01-30-02, 04:40 PM
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Thanks for your insight toiletjockey! As a matter of fact I do have a whole house filter, its an old sears model thats probably 20 years old but they still make the cartridges for it. I keep it changed regularly, probably 4 or 5 times a year mainly for the iron content in our water, but since your response I looked at the package and it said "filters up to 5 microns". What exactly does the number of microns mean, and is lower better or do I need to go for a higher number of microns? Id be willing to change to another complete filter if it would help me maintain better pressure throughout the house. Thanks!
 
  #6  
Old 01-30-02, 05:00 PM
toiletjockey
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You would be better off with a filter that isn't wound like yarn. A filter that is shaped like an accordian and looks like paper material will provide much less pressure drop. As far as microns when you find a filter like I desribed it will be a 30 to 40 micron filter. The bigger the number smaller things get through but this is where you gain some pressure increase. With a small micron filter # like 5 or so it takes alot of water pressure to push through and it doesn't take vey long for it to clog up making it even harder for the water to push through.
 
 

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