Vent tee

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  #1  
Old 05-25-02, 07:54 AM
timjkarp
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Vent tee

I am laying out the dwv for my new bath. I am planning on using a tee on a horizontal line to vent. I had seen this done in a book. Someone told me that you can't use a tee to vent on a horizontal line, saying that code doesn't allow it. They say I should use a wye or combo. Is this true and why?
 
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Old 05-25-02, 10:00 AM
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When you were looking at your pictures, you probably saw a sanitary tee. (Allowable in some instances under different codes)

Let's start kinda at the beginning. Drainage fittings like ABS have the proper slope of the drainage already built into the fitting. PVC does not. (PVC is made for water but I have seen it used for drains, air lines, even chemical feed systems, great product when used properly)
A combo is like a sanitary tee only it has a long side outlet that bends.
A Wye is just like it says, a "Y" .

Every fitting has it's proper place and this is where it gets tricky.
If you use a combo or wye on a lavatory or kitchen sink drain, it is very possible to have the branch run into the stack, higher than the weir on the p-trap. This is bad... You have to have the proper pitch all the way on drains.

My best answer to you would be, ask your local building inspector what code you need to follow, then go from there.

Have fun with your project and if you have more questions, ask away in this thread.
 
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Old 05-25-02, 03:36 PM
Meadowraven
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Hello!

I am hoping only to add to your info and understanding.

Although you don't list your location ( I may have had your codes stashed in my storage), MOST codes nationally follow the same general rulings under BOCA and IAMPO....plumbing assns.

However...some states/counties etc. choose to do it differently, and that is ONLY under their ruling and acceptable within their jurisdiction.


~~~~~~~



Here are two links that help explain a lil better.

http://www.co.mesa.co.us/building/res_plumbing.htm


http://popularmechanics.com/home_imp...s/index2.phtml



I will keep looking, as I have a link with a great vent system/bathroom layout.
I hope to come back and post it if possible.

Hope I have also helped clarify. Please write back if I can help further.
 

Last edited by Meadowraven; 05-25-02 at 03:54 PM.
  #4  
Old 05-25-02, 03:51 PM
Meadowraven
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Ok I'm back!

First of all, I noticed our own DIY pgs weren't mentioned previous.

http://doityourself.com/plumbing/plumbdrain.htm

Here is some great pictures and explanations re: tee usage.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Also I'll post one of my fav sites: Pop.Mechanics......please read the Tee-d Off section , that will explain the whys a bit also.



http://www.pmmag.com/CDA/ArticleInfo...,13978,00.html



I'm just a post away if I can help further!
 
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Old 05-26-02, 08:40 AM
timjkarp
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Originally posted by notuboo
When you were looking at your pictures, you probably saw a sanitary tee. (Allowable in some instances under different codes)

Let's start kinda at the beginning. Drainage fittings like ABS have the proper slope of the drainage already built into the fitting. PVC does not. (PVC is made for water but I have seen it used for drains, air lines, even chemical feed systems, great product when used properly)
A combo is like a sanitary tee only it has a long side outlet that bends.
A Wye is just like it says, a "Y" .

Every fitting has it's proper place and this is where it gets tricky.
If you use a combo or wye on a lavatory or kitchen sink drain, it is very possible to have the branch run into the stack, higher than the weir on the p-trap. This is bad... You have to have the proper pitch all the way on drains.

My best answer to you would be, ask your local building inspector what code you need to follow, then go from there.

Have fun with your project and if you have more questions, ask away in this thread.
You sure about the PVC slope thing? I think it does have slope built into a san tee. I was trying to figure out how to get the slope in a horizontal run to a san tee and someone told me it has the slope built into the tee and I checked it and it sure looks like it.

Tim
 
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Old 05-26-02, 08:45 AM
timjkarp
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I think I found the answer to san tee on it's back for vent from a code check book. You aren't supposed to use it where the san tee would be below the flood rim level of the fixture, which in my case it would be. I guess the reason for this is that water will try to reach it's own level and if the level is up to the flood rim then water will go up the tee and block the vent line. A wye or combo would fix that with it set at 45 degrees.
 
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Old 05-26-02, 02:11 PM
Meadowraven
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Absolutely correct. You will need that wye or LTY (combo--long TY) for the application.

The ABS tee does have slight flow lines and you're correct re: flood level/flow,etc.

PVC fittings don't have near the flow lines (if at all depending on the piece), due to how PVC is used.

If I can help further pls write back.
Have a good 'n!
 
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Old 05-26-02, 05:21 PM
timjkarp
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It seems like my 3x3x3 san tee has some slope built in. I think PVC is used in my area for most dwv. How would you create slope if it isn't built into the fitting. I can see how to do it with a wye or combo on it's side, but not with a san tee.

Another question- I need to go through 6 joists with my shower 2 inch drain line. What is the best way to determine where to cut the holes with the slope in mind or should I just cut 3 inch holes?
 
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Old 05-26-02, 06:57 PM
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Another code question, without even realizing it!

You are going to have to ask an inspector what building code you fall under. You just cant bore holes any size and where you want them. Most liberal cases, 1/3 the size of the beam...but it all depends. God, I love these answers.

Very differing building codes, worse than plumbing.

I'm not really trying to be difficult, but give you an idea of what you need to know so you don't destroy something while trying to repair it. I work under 3 different plumbing codes with 4 variants in a 2 county area. Codes can be difficult to follow, but you need to know what code your looking at.
 
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Old 05-27-02, 08:39 PM
timjkarp
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Notuboo-
What's an inspector? ; ) I am doing all of it myself, but going to try to do it right and may just get permits if I feel confident enough. I am going to keep the holes to 1/3 and to a minimum. The boneheads who did the bath originally had chiseled (gouged) out a hole 2"x8" in one joist that caused a split down the side evidently trying to find the right place for the hole.

What about the PVC slope question?
 
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Old 05-28-02, 05:08 PM
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Meadowraven answered the PVC slope question back a ways. If you have a PVC sanitary 'tee', it will have the required slope built in. Other PVC 'tees', el's, etc do not as they are used for water (under pressure), and this is not an issue.

Have fun and take your time. When in doubt, cover it with sheetrock....
 
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Old 05-28-02, 06:05 PM
Meadowraven
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Thank you notuboo!


Ok Tim, (backing up a second)....


an inspector:


a person from your local City or County or State who oversees homeowner and contractor projects.

With homeowners, they sometimes allow some latitude how you do the project, BUT!!!!! your layout MUST follow proper plumbing procedures (Plumb.Code), which is set up by IAMPO, BOCA, etc. (the plumb.organizations
I spoke of earlier).


Sooooooooo not knowing if you are geographically within a city limits or in the county, or if the State would oversee how you do your project, start with your local city - Bldg.Dept. or Plumb.Dept.

They will point you in the right direction....

 
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Old 06-05-02, 09:52 PM
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Better late then never?

First- No Sanitary Tee is permited to be laid on its back or side below the flood rim of any fixture within the system per any and all codes within the United States. A Sanitary Tee may be stacked on a vertical rise.
Second- All PVC DWV fittings have a built in gradient according to their size, ie. 1-1/2" thru 3" have 1/4"per ft., 4" thru 6" have 1/8"
8" and up 1/16".
Third- The size of hole needed for a 2" PVC line is 2-9/16"
If you are crossing six floor joists, the width of which are only 5-1/2" your out of all codes again. (the hole being more then 50% of your joist) If you take into account the fall needed over that distance (16 or 24 inch centers) you will not be able to maintain the pipe within the joists anyway.
Hence the word plumbing chase. All things are possible, but do a little more investigating before you pull out the Saw-Zal : )
 
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