Tropical Fish in Pond?

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  #1  
Old 02-23-04, 02:09 PM
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Tropical Fish in Pond?

In addition to my goldfish, I have had plecostemus over the summer for algae control and swordtails which reproduced well. I was wondering if anyone else has kept tropicals in their pond over summer and if so, did they reproduce?
 
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  #2  
Old 02-23-04, 04:36 PM
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Hi schiejr

It would probably help if you could tell us where you are or at least what your climate extremes are.

I'm the last one to ask about tropical fish - they won't survive here except in an indoor and heated aquarium, so hopefully someone from warmer climes could help.

I do know that goldfish will overwinter in our freezing climate as long as the H2O stays liquid and there is enough oxygenation and gas exchange in the water to keep the fish from suffocating

Hope someone here can give you some pointers on the tropicals

Howie
 
  #3  
Old 02-23-04, 05:47 PM
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Thanks for the reply howiek. I have been doing aquariums for 25 years so it is not so much knowing about the fish but being curious what other folks have had experience with in their ponds, especially with breeding. I have heard rainbows, barbs, danios and cichlids and thought I would start a thread and see if anyone had personal successes with certain species they were willing to share. Compared to raising them in an aquarium, the fish usually grow faster and have better color due to the natural foods available in the pond.

I was going to try some turquoise rainbows this summer in addition to the swordtails and aquarium plants I move outside. I am in zone 4/5 and usually have to wait until June before the water gets warm enough, although the swordtails surprised me and survived some long periods of sixties and some dips into fifties over night. My plecostemus did alright into the forties until I finally caught him in the fall, having grown from three inches to nine.
 
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Old 02-24-04, 12:40 PM
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Hi again

Your observations about the fish growing bigger and possible healthier are echoed here in Toronto. Goldfish have been flourishing and last year (summer) we had a whole bunch of Ruby Reds (minnows) give live-birth to young-uns.

Hope everyone (and anyone) who has similar experiences will post them here for all to see

Howie
 
  #5  
Old 02-26-04, 02:32 AM
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My self I also place a few Plecostemus in my pond over the summer, they seem to be very happy to be there, even though I'll be lucky to see them once or twice over the whole summer.
In fact they are down my base ment right now sitting in a 10 gallon tank just waitting for spring to get here so I can get them back into the pond.

But to the point, I never really had any luck breeding anything other then puppies, but ever year for some reason there are baby fish in my pond, they look like guppies but are probable minnons from bird droppings.

Last year was the first year I've seen eggs in my pond, it was probable june when I noticed there were 100's of eggs all over the liner of my pond, but to tell you the truth I have no clue what they were, but they were pretty big eggs. But they didn't have a chance. The koi had a feild day on them, they eat them all up in no time. They were probable some type of insect eggs.

Up to about last year I was about ready to start a indoor pond, I've seen a few of them and they looked really nice. With a good heater I suppose I could have put anything in there. But after hearing some advise from someone, I decided not to due to a mold issue that could happen.

Anyhow good luck on your hobby, it sounds really interesting.

My goal this year is to start getting my koi to eat from my hand. Any advise is welcome. How do I start? Do the fish have to be a certain age?
 
  #6  
Old 02-26-04, 10:36 AM
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Thanks for sharing your experiences, Yellow Tang. With a name like that, I would expect you to be running some saltwater in addition to the pond. Ditto on not seeing the plecos. Lack of algae is usually my only indicator they are still in business.

The more used to you the fish are, the more likely they are to hand feed, so I guess older is better. My goldfish are much more wary when out in the pond-anything looming over them or shadows tend to spook them. If they get used to your presence and associate it with food, you are on you way. For example, you could feed them and stay by the pond and then move on to leaving your hand in the water while they feed and then to eating out of your hand.

When I bring my goldfish inside to their 90 gal aquarium, they are more relaxed which I equate with better visibility and their fellows close by. They see me coming from across the room and start swimming frantically against the glass, waiting for the eats and will eat out of my hand, whereas I have never taken the time to try to get them to do it outside. A friend of mine has a horribly overcrowded pond but it seems this makes the fish more relaxed than if there are only few-safety in numbers/school protection. They rarely spook as mine do outside. I have about half a dozen in the same volume my friend has what looked like 30.
 

Last edited by schiejr; 02-26-04 at 10:54 AM.
  #7  
Old 02-27-04, 02:45 AM
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Schiejr do you keep the Plecos out all year round, or do you bring them in for the winter?

I think you hit it right on the head with all the info you said, I think it does have the do with the age of the fish, but I also feel the more fish you have the easier it would be to train them to eat out of your hand. Being that the more fish you have , the more likely some of them won't eat due to numbers and size. So i feel they are more likely to take chances and eat directly from your hand. If one fish would take a chance and eat out of my hand , with no problems the rest of them would also learn it's safe.

You were right, I did have my share of salt water reef tanks which I recently just gave up. I was into it for about 8 years but lack of time caused me to hang it up. That hobby is very time consuming and expensive.
 
  #8  
Old 02-27-04, 06:28 AM
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I bring everything in for the winter, even the goldfish. None of my ponds are deep enough to avoid the deep freeze. I usually keep the goldfish out from late March to October frosts, the plecos and tropicals depend on the weather, but usually late May to early September.
 
  #9  
Old 02-28-04, 01:37 AM
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Can I ask what state your from and how deep the pond is? Myself I'm from PA and it gets pretty cold here in the winter. Even though I do keep my koi and goldfish out all year round, if I had the room I would bring them in during winter months with out a doubt. Just to see them more.

But just for on readers my pond is about 2 feet deep and I never lost a fish yet due to winter. I have 2 fancy goldfish they are about 3 inchs big, and koi ranging from 5 to 1 foot big.

On the bottom of the pond I have a 2 foot section of a clay drainage pipe which gives the fish a place to hide or sleep in winter months. I also have a floating pond heater and I keep a pump running , which keeps the surface water moving at all times.

Even if I didn't have any fish out there all winter, I would still have a pump moving the water. I seen a lot of people just pull everything out of there pond and just leave the pond sit. What happens is the pond becomes a solid ice block , which expands and will crack plastic pond liners. Come spring, they wonder why they always have to add water, this is why.

Just a little tip to who ever is interested....
 
  #10  
Old 02-28-04, 08:06 AM
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Wisconsin, zone 4/5. I am too cheap to run heaters and pumps so I keep the stocking low and lots of plants and everything does fine, with the occasional water change if it does not rain. My deepest inground pond has rigid liner about 2 feet deep. My other pond is an old stainless steel water therapy tank about 2' deep by 5' by 9' in an hour glass shape that sits on my back patio. I have some pictures on a small website I made for a class.
http://www.merr.com/users/schiermj/
 

Last edited by schiejr; 02-28-04 at 01:59 PM.
  #11  
Old 12-17-07, 01:31 PM
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when is cold too cold?

I have a cement pond that's about 40 gallons. I live in southwest florida, just south of the zone 9/10 line. We don't freeze here, though once every three to five years we'll get a frost.

My goldfish do just fine. My plecos die when it gets too cold. I haven't quite figured out the exact line between too cold and not too cold, but i figure it happens somewhere in the low 40s.

since the pond is a complicated series of plexiglass and grating for raccoon protection, fishing the pleco out is probably not an option. I rarely get a glimpse of him as it is.

I will probably resort to dumping some warm water into the pond every few hours on the cold nights, and turning the waterfall off so the water won't cool so fast.
 
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