Dirty natural pond

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  #1  
Old 04-18-04, 08:03 AM
myfirsthome
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Question Dirty natural pond

Hi,


I recently bought a house with a small natural pond in the backyard that is fed constantly by a spring. The pond is filthy and sludgy looking. It also looks like the homeowners put in a soft pool liner under all that sludge.

I have a couple of questions that I hope someone can help me with. First of all do you know of any easy (lol) way to remove this muck? Would it be best to try and drain the pond and just remove the liner and install a new liner? Honestly I don't know how this can be done because the water is always flowing...

Once the whole pond is cleaned out...is there a way to assure that this dirt and sludge doesn't accumulate again? I didn't know if there was a cleaning or filtering system for natural ponds or not.

As you can see, I'm clueless.
thanks for you help
 
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  #2  
Old 04-18-04, 09:27 AM
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Since it has a liner, it is no longer natural. This would be better placed in Water Gardens.
 
  #3  
Old 04-18-04, 10:38 AM
myfirsthome
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thanks for your help
 
  #4  
Old 04-20-04, 09:50 AM
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Not much experience with these but I will think out loud. Natural ponds have muck in them, adding plants and rocks may help to keep the muck in place and keep it from getting stirred up. Marshy areas chock full of bog plants or marginals also act as a natural filter that should promote settling of solids and clear the water.
 
  #5  
Old 04-20-04, 04:26 PM
myfirsthome
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Thank you for responding to my post without making me feel dumb

You're right, the pond is awfully mucky, and there are already rocks and plants in the water...I really wanted to remove all of this gook and basically start over with a clean pond...and hoped that there was something out there that I could put in the pond to keep it relatively gunk free...

It doesn't look like there is a way to do that...but I do appreciate your input...I think I will clean out as much as I can with a soft rake..that might help...lol..

I hope..

Thanks again for your help
 
  #6  
Old 04-20-04, 05:10 PM
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I would love to have a natural spring fed pond to work on. We have spring-fed lakes in my area and it is neat to go canoeing in the summer and see/feel the clear cold water bubbling up into the warm zone.

I wonder how deep the gunk is ? Why is it gunky? Is the spring stirring up the mud on the bottom? Your situation reminds me of planting water lillies in containers-top soil compacted on the bottom and a layer of gravel on top to help hold it in place. Perhaps this is what they were trying to do with the liner.
 
  #7  
Old 04-28-04, 09:27 AM
mark065
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hmmm, sounds like a fun project. I have no experience with this sort of thing so I'm just giving my 2 cents. I'm hoping to build a pond of my own next year but that's another story.

I would clean out as much of the muck as possible and then try to locate where, exactly, the spring feed is (if there is a pinpoint location)...it could just weep up throughout the entire bottom of the pond but that doesn't sound normal....then again, is anything "normal"? :-)

I would then try to "control" or seal the bottom of the pond with a natural surface, maybe sand or clay....keeping in mind where the spring feed is because the water will come up whether you like it or not so don't try blocking it off or it may come up where you don't want it to. :-)

Next I would lay in a pebble bottom and work my way up from there.

The clay or sand should seal of the remaining muck and now all you have to worry about is keeping the muck out form above. The sand may (should?) also act as a natural filter for the bubbling spring water.

again, just my thoughts, but that's what my first attempt would be.

good luck with your project.



hmmm...just had another thought :-)....line it with concrete except for one area which will be the "spring feed" area
That'll control the muck! :-)
 
  #8  
Old 04-28-04, 03:43 PM
myfirsthome
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wow...sounds like you have a lot of great ideas...at least I think they're great...lol..
Since I'm new to all of this as well I can only go by what "sounds" great..lol.

I just bought this house...but from what I understand the actual spring itself is above us and it rolls downhill like a small waterfall over stones and empties into the pond. The previous owners put in a pool liner with a big drain on one end so that when it rains the excess water drains into it which I think is somehow hooked into a culvert that leads to a creek. The pond was definitely not put there for aesthetic reasons...it is a definite necessity...without it we would have a flooded back yard and house as the water falls 24/7 downhill over the rocks. and also...
If there were no drain in the pond I think the whole pond would overflow into the yard...which is already a bit mushy from some overflow.

I suppose that's the reason the previous homeowners put a liner in it to begin with...so that they could hook up a drain as well.

I really liked the sound of some of your ideas and I do appreciate your taking the time to respond to my question...I will run these ideas past my fiance and see what he thinks.
thank you again....and good luck with YOUR pond when you put it in.
 
  #9  
Old 04-28-04, 08:00 PM
Californialands
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muck water soloution

Originally Posted by myfirsthome


wow...sounds like you have a lot of great ideas...at least I think they're great...lol..
Since I'm new to all of this as well I can only go by what "sounds" great..lol.

I just bought this house...but from what I understand the actual spring itself is above us and it rolls downhill like a small waterfall over stones and empties into the pond. The previous owners put in a pool liner with a big drain on one end so that when it rains the excess water drains into it which I think is somehow hooked into a culvert that leads to a creek. The pond was definitely not put there for aesthetic reasons...it is a definite necessity...without it we would have a flooded back yard and house as the water falls 24/7 downhill over the rocks. and also...
If there were no drain in the pond I think the whole pond would overflow into the yard...which is already a bit mushy from some overflow.

I suppose that's the reason the previous homeowners put a liner in it to begin with...so that they could hook up a drain as well.

I really liked the sound of some of your ideas and I do appreciate your taking the time to respond to my question...I will run these ideas past my fiance and see what he thinks.
thank you again....and good luck with YOUR pond when you put it in.
Hello,
The first thing you need to think about is getting that muck out. This will require you to drain your pond. You will need to divert the water somehow for a few days while you are working on the project. I dont know how much flow you have or where it comes from or where it goes and that project is a whole different story. So now that the pond is empty, clean it out all the muck and weed plants that you dont want. If you want to save plants you willl need a temporary nursery (kiddy pool , somthing. ) Ok now down to buissness The problem you are having is called a giant setteling pool. To get rid of this gunk that settels in your pond you need to install a "bottom drain". This is located at the deepest part of the pond and you might need more than one. A bottom drain consists of a screen of some sort as to not clog your pipe. This drain will be your new outlet for your pond! It is than connected to a 4" pipe (whatever is cheapest or sufficiant enough to handle the capacity of water comming in. you want to completly change the water in a pond about 2 to 3 times an hour for nice water) it can be installed over your liner. Run your pipe the way that the pond is naturally flowing now up over the rim and down the watercorse.
So your check list includes redirect water, clean out muck, Fiugure out your inlet flow, match pipe to keep up with flow, Install bottom drain, Now siphon away!!!! You can also have an overflow if its alot of water but if the bottom of your pond is sucking from siphon pressure you will be alot more muck free!
 
  #10  
Old 04-29-04, 03:26 AM
myfirsthome
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Thank you for all the info......

What you're saying makes alot of sense....
I really don't know the first thing about this...so I am going to run this idea by my fiance.

He's the one who's going to be draining the pond and cleaning it so that we can start over...He gets to do ALL the fun stuff...

thanks again
 
  #11  
Old 05-02-04, 07:58 PM
boggen
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hi myfirsthome, did have a good reply but after hitting submit it never went through.

califonialands ya got your math back words its turning over entire ponds water every 1 to 3 hours not 2 to 3 times a single hour. one being overly stocked with fish and 3 being more of a water flower garden to a simple waterfall.

had plenty of questions but taking a cheat cheat out of it instead of retyping it all
a good site that has alot of people building ponds / redoing them etc.. and asking plenty of questions is...
www.koivet.com

also bottom drain with anti vortex hood. a bottom drain something like you might find in a bath tub or shower will hardly work at all in taking crud around it. a bottom drain with anti vortex hood is made for ponds and draws water from the bottom and not from directly above the drain.
 
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