airating or oxygenating a pond

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Old 06-28-06, 09:59 AM
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airating or oxygenating a pond

In the next few months I will be contracting someone to dig a 1 to 1 1/2 acre fish pond. Will this fish pond be big enough to support its own oxygen or will I need to provide oxygen with a supplemental pump? This pond will be a dug pond vs. a damned spring or creek fed pond.

I have heard of fish kill because people did not provide enough oxygen to a small recreational pond but at what size is it safe for the pond to provide its own oxygen.
 
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Old 06-28-06, 05:07 PM
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A lot depends on where you are located, is the pond in the open or surrounded by trees and how many fish you have. Even a tiny goldfish bowl can take in enough oxygen to support a little fish. Keep in mind that the vast majority of ponds are NOT aerated.

That said, it is possible for you to have a fish kill. All ponds will develop a thermocline. The sun heats the water near the surface so the warm water rises to the top and the cold water sinks to the bottom of the pond. The warm water on top gets oxygen and the cold water on the bottom gets none. This is OK because the fish will go to the water with oxygen. If you get a real windy day or a big cold rainstorm it can stir up the pond or "turn it over". All of a sudden the thin layer of oxygenated water is diluted by water with little oxygen. Fish that require a lot of oxygen or weaker fish may be killed. This is a bigger problem if you have too many fish in your pond. Even with that risk 99% of all ponds do not have aeration and do just fine. Aeration is expensive and really not needed in most cases.
 
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Old 06-29-06, 06:02 AM
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Only one thing to add to Pilots input

Totally agree with Pilot Dane. You can always help with plants, plants plants .... good stuff for ponds plants are ....
 
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Old 06-29-06, 08:12 AM
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Thanks for tips guys. I thought plants take away oxygen. I once read, that a pond should not be any shallower than 4 feet to prevent unwanted growth of plants and algea.

Boomer
 
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Old 06-29-06, 01:59 PM
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Your local Dept. of Agriculture Extension Agent can provide you with info on pond construction, such as soil type, clay liner, invasive plant species, water quality, evaporation, spillway, whether or not a permit is needed, etc. You will want to wait a year before adding fish.
 
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Old 06-29-06, 04:12 PM
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Most plants add oxygen to the pond during the day but when the sun goes down they take some oxygen out of the water to survive. Plants make far more during the day than they consume at night. Still, plants are a good idea. On the whole plants do add oxygen to the water and they provide food and cover for your fish.

Deeper water will help control plants that are anchored to the bottom like cattails, lillies and pondweed but it will do nothing to control floating plants such as algae, duckeweed or watermeal. You do not want large areas of shallow water because you will soon have a swamp or marsh instead of a pond.
 
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