First time fish pond installation - help!

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  #1  
Old 04-07-08, 01:43 PM
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First time fish pond installation - help!

Hi -

I am looking to install a fairly small fish pond in my backyard. (50-150 gallon). Does anyone know of any good books, articles, resources to look at for someone who wants to install it himself? Words of wisdom?

Thanks
 
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Old 04-07-08, 03:09 PM
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A common problem, to my eye, is the exposed plastic or concrete, between the water surface and the edging stones. It looks unnatural.

You can obscure that area by setting largish stones in concrete, around the pond, so that they overhang a bit. The concrete also prevents stones from sinking down on a membrane covered earth rim.

If you have raccoons in the area, make your pond too deep for them to wade in and feel around. Raccoons love ponds. Also, know that they will upturn any pots, pumps, etc. they can lay a paw on.
 
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Old 04-08-08, 01:48 AM
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Good morning Tripod,

There's a load of information on the internet...just type "build small pond" in your search engine.

I think it's clever that you call it, "My first pond"...that is undoubtedly true! As soon as you build one you begin thinking of ways you could improve your original design.

My best advice is to be cautious about where you locate your pond. The water needs some shade, else you'll be constantly fighting algae, but try not to locate it where you will spend all your time on maintenance from tree debris.

My first pond is under a tulip poplar and gets pods, petals and leaves. It's not enough to make me want to move it, but it does require a lot of care.

Connie
 
  #4  
Old 04-19-08, 01:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Tripod23 View Post
Hi -

I am looking to install a fairly small fish pond in my backyard. (50-150 gallon). Does anyone know of any good books, articles, resources to look at for someone who wants to install it himself? Words of wisdom?

Thanks
if at all possible, build much larger. avoid rigid preformed liners. I have alot of advice for you, but #1 is go as big as possible. Its actually easier to maintain, the larger you build. My email is ******* if youd like some day to day advice on building a pond.
 

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Old 04-19-08, 01:22 AM
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Originally Posted by Kobuchi View Post
A common problem, to my eye, is the exposed plastic or concrete, between the water surface and the edging stones. It looks unnatural.

You can obscure that area by setting largish stones in concrete, around the pond, so that they overhang a bit. The concrete also prevents stones from sinking down on a membrane covered earth rim.

If you have raccoons in the area, make your pond too deep for them to wade in and feel around. Raccoons love ponds. Also, know that they will upturn any pots, pumps, etc. they can lay a paw on.
so how many ponds have you used concrete around the outside, to keep the edging stones from falling in, question mark. man, thats weak. proper design calls for 0, that zero concrete or mortar. maybe a bit of black foam to finalise the waterfall, but no-one should mortar nothin.
 
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Old 04-19-08, 01:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Tripod23 View Post
Hi -

I am looking to install a fairly small fish pond in my backyard. (50-150 gallon). Does anyone know of any good books, articles, resources to look at for someone who wants to install it himself? Words of wisdom?

Thanks
Hi, me again. I cant stress enough how important it would be to use a flexible liner, rather than a pre-formed liner. Basically, you excavate your pond-hole, then purchase a liner of the proper size. I think they come in 10foot, or 15 foot widths. Length is what you need. i bought a 1 piece liner for my pond last year that was 54 feet long, by 15 wide. Very heavy, very expensive. $700. There are some crucial design points that you should be aware of, so email me. Im James from Newmarket, Ontario.
 

Last edited by Shadeladie; 04-19-08 at 05:45 PM. Reason: Email address not allowed.
  #7  
Old 04-19-08, 02:04 AM
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Concrete is "weak"?

To clarify, I'm talking about concrete ponds. What I've done in the past, is, build up a fairly wide concrete rim that flat stones set into. Large stone, about 1/3 overhang. I've yet to have one tip in - a person standing at the edge just can't exert much leverage on it. I don't joint pond stones right up to the surface (unnatural look).

Since you asked, motorfly, I've built three ponds, all over a decade ago. Two concrete, with no problems. One rubber, with stones just placed around the edge, as the customer insisted. That has since been removed, because the edge of course is unstable and stones were always rocking underfoot and creeping out of place. It looked shabby, but the owner was determined to get her money's worth out of that liner!
 
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Old 04-21-08, 10:37 PM
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I've only built 1 pond. It's in my back-yard. I come from a landscape construction background, and now i own a septic tank pumping buisness. In both feilds i've discovered that the use of concrete is usually the result of poor design, and always shortens the life-span of any landscape. I laid at least 13 tonnes of 4" and 3" inch northern canada granite for my waterfalls, and edgeing. Not a single ounce of concrete. concrete has a limited life span, so i recommend not to use it-EVER for for residential landscapes. Let the Italians build sidewalks with it. Thaey have the skills, and its not upside your pond.
 
  #9  
Old 04-23-08, 12:08 PM
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I prefer a flexible liner as well. And seeing as the OP is "new", it gives them more options. Concrete is well, "concrete".

If you get bitten by the pond bug (and you will!) next year you will find that 50-150 is way too small. I started off small as well. As others have pointed out, larger is actually easier to maintain, and easier on the fish.

Less tempature fluctuations, and the fish can last a winter, as the pond wont freeze (solid-make sure minimum depth is approx 24-30 inches depending upon location). In Minnesota, make it about 6 feet!).

My pond now is about 900-1000 gallons depending upon rainfall, and if I add water in the summer months.

Because I used a liner, it was pretty simple to pull the old small liner out and dig, dig, dig.

Had I used concrete, it would have been much more of a hassle.

Lots of bookstores have pond books, and don't forget the library for reference either.

Also, it pays to shop around. Look at unexpected sources for supplies. Menards (in my area) has some really good supplies at very reasonable prices (SunTerra, Fish Mate) at MUCH lower prices that some local "pond" suppliers. Online is very good for gettting low prices on UV lamps, bulbs, and lights.

Good luck!
 
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