Salt water pool???

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  #1  
Old 07-13-03, 05:52 PM
PlainBill
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Salt water pool???

We've just moved into a 'new' house a couple of months ago, and are still trying to figure out all of the amenities.

On of the strange things we noticed is the pool water is salty. Unfortunately, while the previous owner left us a lot of information, they didn't mention that, and they're out of the country.

This is Phoenix, so the water is pretty hard, and we lose a lot of water to evaporation. I did a little research and discovered there is a chlorination system which relies on salt in the pool water, but there are no signs of an electrolytic cell.

What are the implications of this? The pool water is clear, so I'm inclined to leave well enough alone.

PlainBill
 
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  #2  
Old 07-16-03, 01:27 PM
Ed Imeduc's Avatar
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pools

Dont know if this helps. But on the web here I have seen what you are talking about that have the salt that will give you the chiorine the pool needs . Most of the time it looks just like a piece of the pipe going back to the pool. Me I just dump chlorine in. ED
 
  #3  
Old 07-18-03, 03:13 PM
PlainBill
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Ed, I'm from the 'dump chlorine in as needed school' myself.

The electrolytic cell for the 'salt water system' might look like a piece of pipe, but it also has an electronic controller. And I am certain that there isn't one.

PlainBill
 
  #4  
Old 07-18-03, 04:08 PM
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Im with you there dont like it when there is more electric in the pool.I do the chlorine also. You have seen here that 20 mule team broax will raise the PH and that Baking soda will raise the alkalinity, can get this in 10 lb box at SAMS.Also dont know if they do it out there but we screen the whole pool in. Cuts down on water loss. sun burn and chlorine loss some. and no bugs. ED
 
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Old 07-18-03, 05:10 PM
PlainBill
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Ed,

For some reason, pool enclosures are rare in this area. Probably something to do with the 75 MPH+ winds from microbursts during the monsoon season.

PlainBill
 
  #6  
Old 07-18-03, 05:30 PM
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Hey Im in Florida talk about the wind we have it. The new code on them is they have to stand 120 mph wind. your out there in AZ ???? did you get the AC clean cant you use a swamp cool there. Know I did when I was out there. ED
 
  #7  
Old 07-18-03, 06:06 PM
PlainBill
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I've lived in Florida. I'm not sure about the qualitative difference between a hurricane and a microburst.

A swamp cooler works until the dew point gets up to about 55, then it definitely generates a swamp-like environment. We hit that point last week, which is why I turned on the AC.

PlainBill
 
  #8  
Old 07-18-03, 06:22 PM
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oh ya

you need cut off at 50 on the dew point. hey can we run one on dry days and the AC on the damp days. The misroburst??? you mean the dust devils??? or like water spouts we have them saw a lot of water spouts when I was down in the caribbean for a while. ED
 
  #9  
Old 07-19-03, 10:55 AM
PlainBill
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Ed,

Since I'm new to Phoenix, I'm still learning about this stuff, but from what I've been able to glean from the newspapers, sometime in early July the air flow patterns shift and Phoenix gets warm, moist air from the Sea of Cortez (AKA Gulf of California to us Americanos).

Once this happens, there aren't very many days when an evaporative cooler will work until some time in September when the weather pattern reverses and the humidity drops. I'm quite content to switch between EC, AC, back to EC, and then to heat as the seasons change. A day to day switch between AC and EC doesn't seem practical, because the EC dumps moist air into the house, especially when the temperature and humidity are high.

I haven't seen a microburst, but it appears that Phoenix frequently gets extremely localized storms that result in a column of rapidly descending air. Think of a hurricane force wind moving vertically - down. These beasts are strong - they have been known to move concrete garbage cans around shopping centers, tear tiles off roofs, etc.

PlainBill
 
  #10  
Old 07-30-03, 04:01 PM
curtis_strain
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I know this is late, but maybe you still need the info. I have a salt water chlorinator in the phoenix area, and after learning how to maintain the pool with it, I like it quite a bit.

There defnitely needs to be a cell somewhere that shocks the water and splits the Cl off the NaCl. If it tastes salty but no cell, it's possible they had a salt water chlorinator, didn't like it, and chucked the cell and just went back to adding chlorine w/o refilling the pool. I don't think this would be a problem. Over time, the salt level will drop as you add water and water from the pool is splashed and backwashed out.

You could take a sample to a pool store (leslie's in the valley is good) and they should be able to tell you the amount of salt in the water. If it's significant, I'll bet they didn't like it and just got rid of the cell.
 
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