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Would adding insulation arround hot tub help?

Would adding insulation arround hot tub help?


  #1  
Old 08-11-04, 03:06 PM
CanadianInIowa's Avatar
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Question Would adding insulation arround hot tub help?

This is our first hot tub. and I just got the electrical bill!

The electical company just raised their rates at the same time my consumption went up, so my bill almost doubled!

Friends say its high because it had to heat the water from 55 deg to 100 and should go down.

Would adding insulation arround the tub assist with holding the temp?

I have the Weslo 628 6-person spa. 4Kw eater, has a cover. Noticed that with the heater going and the motor going, it draws 40 amps! ( And the wheel on the power meter spins at a high rate!) What is the expected increase in electric cost?

Can I change the heater to LP?

This is an expensive addition!
 
  #2  
Old 08-14-04, 05:13 PM
DennisFisher
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It looks like the Weslo isn't insulated very well from what I can tell. I have a Cal Spa tub and it's insulated well, though they do it in a way that makes maintenance very painfull. My electric bill (in Minnesota) is worst around Jan/Feb and it's about $40 more than average.

When my heater is on and the jets are running, I'm close to 45 amps as I recall. Unfortunately Cal Spa heaters suck (power cycling, prone to overheating, etc.) so the heating rate is only about 2.5 degrees per hour. The in-water coils are good for about 8-10 degrees per hour and more reliable. I think the heater was supposed to be a sales gimmick.

You should be able to do the math and figure it out, but I doubt the initial heating of the water is the bulk of your energy usage.

You might try to stuff (not compress) insulation around the tub inside of the surround.

You can get an LP or NG heater... but you'll pay a huge initial cost and you might have to get it installed which won't be cheap either.
 
  #3  
Old 08-16-04, 06:56 AM
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I will try adding insulation.

Thanks for the reply. I have a roll of r-13 24" wide left over from a project. It looks like I should have room to stuff it inside the frame. I will also seal it better to ensure it does not become a home for the woodland creatures!.
 
  #4  
Old 08-18-04, 02:04 PM
flexpvc
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You do have a cover on it right? Those bubble blanets will help alot. 70% of the heat loss will be thru the surface of the water, not the tub walls if you don't have cover.

Also the NG or LP will be a lot more efficient, but as was said, the initial cost will be higher. Personally I'd never use electricity to heat a tub. Gas is the only way to go, and if you have it for more than a few years, it'll pay for itself.
 
  #5  
Old 08-25-06, 08:28 PM
B
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gas to heat water

can you explain how to do that or point me in the right direction please?
 
 

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