spa over heats after insulation

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  #1  
Old 09-27-05, 11:42 AM
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spa over heats after insulation

Hi,

I just put insulation bats inside my spa's housing.

Now the spa is overheating and the hi-limit switch keeps kicking on.

One thought: I might have disturbed the thermostat probe when I was stuffing the insulation in.

Another thought: the ambient temperature in and around where the probe emerges from the piping or around the spa's control pack (and the thermostat control that's inside) is now too high and this is confusing the temperature controlling machinery. If this second option sounds likely, can I just recalibrate/adjust my thermostat instead of having to remove my lovely, energy-conserving insulation?

Thanks for any advice!
 
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  #2  
Old 09-27-05, 07:40 PM
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You cannot change the stat setting. You will burn up your system if you change it. You have to move the insulation off of the controls,motor. The unit has to get air or it will overheat.

Sorry for the bad news.
 
  #3  
Old 10-03-05, 01:54 PM
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new thermostat; slightly different problem

Hi,

Turns out that the capillary tube had snapped off of the temperature probe, so my thermostat always thought the water was cool. Glad for that hi-limit!

I replaced the thermostat (fun fishing the old probe out of it's well with tweezers), but am having a slightly different problem. I've got the thermostat set to maximum, but it's shutting off the heater at about 100 degrees, just shy of the 104 I'm shooting for. I haven't adjusted the thermostat's calibration screw, so that's still at the position that it was when I bought it.

The area around the control pack, heater, pump, ozonator, etc is free of insulation and is enclosed with a 3/8" thick redwood door that isn't really tight. Nothing in there, including the pump, is too hot to touch when running. The area is definitely a bit warmer than before the insulation, but not so much that I would expect any mechanical components to have problems. The tub sits on a deck with 3/4" spaces between the slats.

I did wrap the capillary tube in electrical tape so that it wouldn't get fried touching anything electrical.

Thanks to Pewee for his/her response. I was suprised to read the cautions on adjusting the thermostat since I've been reading about this idea in other threads. I was all set to try this out. Am I really pushing my luck if I do this? Could I just have a mis-matched thermostat (the physical dimensions are the same).?
 
  #4  
Old 10-03-05, 02:13 PM
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Pewee = Steve (he)

You don't need the electric tape as long as it is routed away from bare contacts and such.

You can adjust it up a bit but don't go over the 104. Just a little bit at a time. What I was talking about was you don't want the area around the motor too hot or the motor won't last. My tub is on a brick patio and the compartment gets warm also. There are holes at each side for air flow

I'm glad to hear the high temp was working. Keep this in mind when adjusting. You don't want it kicking out all the time.

I keep my tub around 101/103. More to the 101. I find I can sit in it a little longer if I don't have it too hot. Plus I have a 10 year old son that gets in with me and I don't want to cook him.
 
  #5  
Old 10-04-05, 10:37 AM
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sounds good...

Hi Steve,

Thanks for the clarification. Sounds like I still have a little room to adjust things. I'm glad to save all the therms by keeping the new insulation if I can. I'll keep the temp at 104 or lower. With the new parts, the hi-limit hasn't been
hasn't had to shut things down, so that's one good thing.

I put the tape on because I fried my (perfectly good) hi-limit while messing around with the thermostat. It, as you described, touched exposed electrical components. The new hi-limit switch came with a protective sleeve on the capllary. Things are kind of crowded inside my control pack, so I figured I should similarly gird my new thermostat with the way my luck's been running.

I could cut a couple of holes and put ventilation screens in if the compartment gets too hot. Hadn't really thought about that. Won't look so slick, but then my enclosure is no great shakes to begin with. I'll keep an eye on this. Place a thermometer in there as a test.

Thanks again!
 
  #6  
Old 10-04-05, 12:46 PM
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You might even be able to go to the local dealer parts counter and get snap in screens for the shell. Just drill the holes with a hole saw and pop in the screens.
 
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