Advice on building pools as a career?

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  #1  
Old 07-30-06, 04:09 PM
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Advice on building pools as a career?

I was recently invited to work full-time building pools. They only do the 1st phase, which is everything but the tile work etc.. (i think). I've never done this line of work before, so I was wondering if any of you do this line of work for a living and could give me some info. How hard is it to learn? How hard is the work? Do you burnout quick on this type of job, or is it something you could do for decades? Any other helpful information would be great.

Thanks!
 
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Old 07-30-06, 04:18 PM
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Depending on what area you live in (hot all year) it could probably be a decent job. Are you talking inground, above ground or both? Although some companies have motorized equipment, there is still a lot of hand digging. Will you be working year round or seasonal? Does this company have a lot of work all the time? Will you have to travel to keep your job? If so, are you compensated for the expenses? Lots of things to look at. Good luck.
 
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Old 07-30-06, 04:28 PM
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heh, I live in Florida lol. I'm pretty sure they do mainly/only in-ground pools. They say they get tons of work, now whether or not they get alot of work in the winter I don't know yet. They asked me to work full-time Mon-Fri, I assume year round. They get most of their work within a 100 mile radius from where we all live and they have company trucks as well. My friend (the owners son) works there and he makes anywhere from $500-$1000+ /week, he said I could be making the same in time. Also metioned it would take about 3-4 months before I got good enough to do it on my own.

thanks
 
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Old 07-30-06, 04:49 PM
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I lived in Ocala for 11 years. I learned one thing quick. The company owners make all the money, not the workers. You can't really compare your wages with what the owners son makes (now or in the future). I did more Plant Maintenance than Plumbing while I was there. $8 to 10 an hour for the Plumber while the owner charged $75 per hour (and banged the customer with to/from milage charges). Granted, the owner had expenses but lets be realistic. We also had to supply all our own tools except torch tanks. I would ask straight out what your hourly wage will be and how long it usually takes to get increases. Good luck.
 
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Old 07-30-06, 04:55 PM
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yea I know how that goes. The owner is a friend of the family, has been for a long time, I don't think he'll try ripping me off. They've got all the tools as well. I'll definitely find out what the wages will be as well as raises.

Thanks man
 
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Old 07-30-06, 05:09 PM
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I was playing devils advocate. This may be a great job and turn into something you love to do and make tons of money. BUT, you always need to think of the other side of the situation. Best of luck with whatever you do.
 
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Old 07-31-06, 04:27 PM
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Also keep in mind that more times than not, mixing friendship or family with business turns out badly. I speak only from personal experience.
 
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Old 07-31-06, 05:08 PM
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Most of the guys I have known that have done this work, worked as laborers and were paid as such. The work was seasonal. You will want to work for an employer that is licensed and insured (workers comp to cover you in case of injury and liability in case of damage to homeowner's property). Ideally, he will be making payroll deductions for worker's comp, unemployment, and all taxes. Getting stuck with a 1099 when it comes time to pay your taxes and you are broke is no fun. And, benefits would be great, such as health insurance.

Of course, if this works out, it has the potential for you to learn every phase of the business and you could stay in the industry or a related one for the rest of your life. Check your local newspaper to see how many employment ads there are for industry related positions: Salesmen, Liner Pool Installers, Liner Replacement Installers, Concrete Pool Installers, Plumbers, Form Steel Installers, Plasterers, Tile & Coping Masons, Job Coordinators, Excavators, Service Technicians, etc. And, there are also the sales rep positions for all products relevant to the industry as well as for new installations and maintenance. Even if you learned some phase of the business, it would make you more marketable to another such company if this did not work out, especially since you are in an area where pool sales and maintenance tend to be high.
 
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Old 07-31-06, 05:45 PM
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Originally Posted by twelvepole
Ideally, he will be making payroll deductions for worker's comp, unemployment, and all taxes. Getting stuck with a 1099 when it comes time to pay your taxes and you are broke is no fun. And, benefits would be great, such as health insurance.
There is no ideally in this situation. In the situation the OP describes, he will be an employee and the employer has no legal choice but to deduct whatever is required per florida and federal laws.

It is not something the employer decides, the rules that require the classification are based in federal law.(specifically the IRS)
 
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Old 08-01-06, 09:56 AM
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Building pools is a fun and challenging career. There is a lot to learn, and it can be very stressful at times. There are many phases of pool building- design, excavation, steel work, plumbing, electrical, gunite, plaster, tile, coping, pool equipment, POOL SAFTY, building codes and so on. I have been in the industry for 16 years and I still go to classes and seminars every year to keep on the ever changing industry.
 
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Old 08-01-06, 05:05 PM
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Originally Posted by pool_guru
Building pools is a fun and challenging career. There is a lot to learn, and it can be very stressful at times. There are many phases of pool building- design, excavation, steel work, plumbing, electrical, gunite, plaster, tile, coping, pool equipment, POOL SAFTY, building codes and so on. I have been in the industry for 16 years and I still go to classes and seminars every year to keep on the ever changing industry.
Do you run your own business? contractor maybe? If so, what kind of profit do you make off building pools? (If it's not too intrusive of a question.)
 
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