re-plumbing pool


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Old 08-18-06, 08:54 AM
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re-plumbing pool

I recently purchased a home that has an in-ground pool. I believe the pool sat empty for awhile, as it appears that it has raised about 4 to 6 inches. Anyway, this movement has caused some of PVC to break. At least that is what I am speculating. I have a pool / spa combo. I have 4 jets in the spa and 4 in the pool. The 4 in the pool are seperated - 3 on one line and one on a separate line. I plugged all of the jets with covers and filled my pool. It holds water with them covered, but loses water if I uncover them (well all except for the one that is on its own line). In fact, when I take any of the covers off, water rushes into the lines from the pool. I can watch small debris get sucked into the jets as well as put my hand over the open jets and feel the water getting sucked in.

I know I can hire a leak detection company to tell me where my leak(s) are at. However, here in Dallas, I've been quoted around $400 to $500 just to do the test, then obviously I'm looking at additional charges to have the repairs done.

What I'm leaning heavily toward doing is foregoing the leak detection and replumbing my pool, or replumbing the leaking jets anyway. I figure for $500 or less I can hire day labor to dig to each of the jets (I can bust up the concrete and repair it myself) and redo the PVC.

My biggest question is, In case the pool resettles or moves at all, I don't want the new PVC to break. I was thinking I could use flex PVC. Is there any reason that I am overlooking that I should not use flex PVC? Does it hold under water pressure as well as regular PVC? Well, it probably doesn't have as high a pressure rating as regular PVC, but will it hold up on this application?

Thanks in advance for any responses / feedback / suggestions.
 
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Old 08-18-06, 12:38 PM
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Flex pipe will do just fine. Better, in my opinion. It uses a different glue, and the only reaon it is not more widely used is the expense. It is used on spas all the time.

I would be more concerned that the pool did not rise equally, and the pool when full will not empty into the skimmers properly.
 
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Old 08-18-06, 01:35 PM
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Thanks for the reply. Surprisingly, it did pretty much rise equally. The pool only has one skimmer, and if anything, it is near the lowest part, so all should be fine with that.

The pool is currently plumbed with 2 inch rigid PVC. Do I have to stay with 2 inch or can I use 1 1/2 inch flex PVC? I wasn't aware that it used different glue, I thought it used the same as rigid PVC. I'm glad you thought to point that out - Thanks!
 
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Old 08-18-06, 02:37 PM
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I'll assume this is a gunite pool. sound like a popout, i would be weary about doing any work to it until it was filled . i think you may have a bigger prolbem on your hands than broken pipes.
i may be blowing things out of porportion, but if it has popped / heaved out , there is a chance it may crack and thats bad, but the pool that i saw had a blow out, the bottom of the deep end literally cracked and blew out the botom. i would consult a gunite pool contractor before investing in any repairs.
 
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Old 08-18-06, 03:03 PM
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Actually, the pool is full right now and doesn't lose water (except for evaporation). It is just that I have all of the jets plugged. Therefore, I know the main drain, spa drain, and skimmer (which I actually just repaired) are all fine. When I remove the plugs on the jets is when I lose water.
 
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Old 08-18-06, 03:38 PM
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good, i was just covering all the bases.
i know very little about gunite construction, but i have seen the ramafications of draining one at the wrong time . it was not a pretty sight.
 
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Old 08-18-06, 06:54 PM
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You must absolutely stay with 2 in. Nothing less will do...
 
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Old 08-18-06, 10:43 PM
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thanks for the info. Thought if I could save a buck by going smaller I would, but if 2 inches is what I need to go with, then 2 inches it is.
 
 

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