How to repair a Pool Leak


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Old 08-24-06, 02:50 PM
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How to repair a Pool Leak

I have an inground pool with a significant leak. Through process of elimination and the red food coloring test, I've identified the two sources. They are the pump lines that return water back to the pool. I have have removed my deck boardin and dug enough around them to confirm these are the sources.

Now, my question is on how to repair. I have done a lot of work with sprinkler systems PVC (cutting, adding a coupling, gluing, etc.). However, the elbow on one of these lines is so close to the concrete pool wall, I'm not sure I can remove the cracked elbow and replace the piping. Is it possible to remove the entire line from the pool wall?
 
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Old 08-28-06, 08:55 AM
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I just re-did all of the plumbing on my inground pool, so while I'm certainly not a pro, I can give you a couple of ideas. I had some fittings that were very close to the concrete walls. I cut them off on the fitting about an inch and half to two inches from the concrete wall. This left me with the pipe with the remainder of the fitting attached to it. I used a pry bar to pry the fitting off of the pipe. If the break is big enough in the fitting, you can also try working a screwdriver into the crack and breaking the fitting off. Either way that should leave you with enough pipe to put a new fitting on. Just make sure that you sand the old glue off. Worse case scenerio, if neither of these methods work, you can cut it off right at the wall. Then buy a fitting that attaches to the inside of the pipe (Lowes sells these). However using this method is going to decrease the inside diameter of the pipe that is in the wall. And, I'm not sure what the consequences of doing that are.

Also, I replaced almost all of my rigid PVC with flex PVC. That way when the ground moves/settles my pipes can move without breaking. The only line I had to use rigid PVC on was my auto cleaner line that had a booster pump. Flex PVC is not recommended for this type of application. You will need 2 inch. I couldn't find it at HD or Lowes. The best price I found was at flexpvc.com.
 

Last edited by calizeus; 08-28-06 at 09:06 AM.
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Old 08-28-06, 01:16 PM
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Thanks. I thought about an internal coupling. I had just not seen one before. Another thought I had was using a flex elbow. They are not designed for pressure use, but the only significant pressure would be when the pump is running.

My other leaky return line is going to be a bigger challenge. It is up underneath 3-4 inches of concrete. Some sort of lip that formed whey they must have poured the concrete wall. I can see the water draining down the pipe, I just can't see the source. It would be nice if there was some way I could cut the pipe and pull it out from the pool wall.

Thanks again calizeus for you guidance. I'll let you know the results once I get further along in the project.
 
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Old 08-31-06, 02:28 PM
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I was able to repair both lines which had significant cracks due to settling. I had to borrow a rotary hammer to help remove a bit of concrete but was able to get the connections on.

Lowes actually does carry some flex PVC plumbing. I just used hard PVC piping but inserted a flex PVC coupling near the pool to allow for more flex/settling. However, pump ran 24 hours and no leaks.
 
 

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