Can I drain my pool?

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  #1  
Old 09-15-07, 06:45 PM
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Can I drain my pool?

I have an inground pool in Miami, FL, water table I think is 3 to 4 feet below grade, the pool is 7 feet deep.

I was told that if I drain the pool it would crack.

However, I need to get it replastered, and now, I am doing major renovation on the house, and will not be using the pool for another 4 months. I would prefer to not have to buy chlorine, shock, acid, PH, and run the pump and filter for 8 hours a day for no reason for 4 months.

Can I drain the pool and leave it dry in the mean time?

I think there is a relieve valve at the bottom of the pool for pressure release, but I am not sure...

Thanks in advance,

MC
 
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  #2  
Old 09-16-07, 07:13 AM
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When the pool was built there should have been a hydrostatic relief valve that would prevent the pool from popping. I would consult with the company that will be plastering the pool. There could also be a construction line that is actually under the pool that you would hook a pump to to pump water out from under pool while empty.
 
  #3  
Old 09-16-07, 07:22 AM
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I know there is a relief valve because when I bought the house there was a leak and I hired someone to repair the leak and he dived down to the main drain during his investigation and told me there is a valve there if I need to drain the pool.

I never moved into the house because I needed to do major work. While construction was going on every week I was doing the chlorine tablet, cleaned the side, running the pump etc...

However I was out of town for two weeks recently and when I came back the pump is green - I mean green like a swamp - I cannot see to the bottom. I can shock it, but the major issue is somehow my timer is broken to cause the pump not to work, and hence algae build up with lack of filtering and everything.

I am not ready to plaster it yet, I need to wait till some other project of the house is done before I turn my attention to the pool, so now I wonder what I can do. No one can dive down and open that valve with the water the way it is now. I would be embarrassed to call a pool company out to drain it with it looking like the green swamp.
 
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Old 09-16-07, 12:25 PM
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Relief valve are automatic, they open and close when needed, no one has to dive down.

To clear pool I would shock it heavily, approx triple the normal. then two days later shock it again. The reason for the triple shock is that with the algae build up it will eat lower doses of chlorine doing nothing to get rid of it. Of course it is best to have pump running when shocking and clearing, but if unable to run pump, you can stil shock and get the green killed. You will need to maintain a chlorine level after killing algae.
 
  #5  
Old 01-23-08, 06:41 PM
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this may be a little late, however if you have not done anything yet,

according to your post, re: water table, and hydrostatic relief valve being questionable,

you need to let a professional handle it for you, for the following reasons..........

1. they should have insurance , .... make sure , because if the pool is drained there is a very real possibility the pool could pop, what happens is hydrostatic pressure underneath the pool will actually lift the pool out of the ground, 1 ft. to as much as 4 ft. I have personally seen this happen and you can imagine the results, the pool will be virtually useless,

steve
 
  #6  
Old 01-23-08, 08:29 PM
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Cool can i drain my pool

I own a pool company in alabama but was in the business in fla. for many years , you will have a hard time finding a pool company with insurance to cover this because the price of that insurance makes it impossible to purchase. The relief valve talked about here may or may not be on your pool in fla. Here's why you may not have one that most people outside of fla. do not realize. If you are on a canal ,which many homes in your area are ,a large boat passing by can cause this valve to pop open and you would come home to a half empty pool. I have seen this happen 3 times(each time it was a large boat 50'+ in a narrow canal) .Here is something else that most people in the business outside of fla. don't know. You HAVE to run a pump 24hrs a day on the hole when you build the pool just to be able to build it. This pump is plumbed into what we call a deadman line. This is a pipe in the gravel bed under your pool. The pump pumps ground water out and runs until there is enough water in the pool not to have to worry anymore then it is cut and capped off. Before you drain your pool to re-plaster you will have to find this line and plumb a pump to it and this pump will again have to run the entire time the pool is empty.To find this line take a metal rod and push it into the ground next to your deck every 2 inches untill you hit it. The line will usually be on the long side of the pool away from the house but may be on one of the ends, it will only be a few inches below ground. This is not really a DIY job because of the need to purchase a pump and the skills needed to plaster-not a one man or even 2 man job etc. I hope this helps and clears up the relief valve issue.-edit-after re-reading I see you do have a valve BUT you still will have to use the deadman because the valve would save your pool from floating but the pool would remain half full -unless you somehow manage to pump out all of the ground water from south fla. the pool will just keep filling up.-To the other pool guys out there unless you've seen this i know it's hard to believe but we hit water at about 18" in most cases.
 
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Old 01-23-08, 09:19 PM
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The fun of haveing a pool down in FL. Like said it will pop up out of the ground on you. From the sound of what you have to do . Id drive down a sand point one or two by the pool deep end and tie them to a pump Let it run for 24 hrs. just an old pool pump will work . You dont need much lift. Then pump out the pool. If you can find that valve in the bottom to open ok . If not Just drill a hole or two in the deep end of the pool. Thats like all the rest do on a new pool put a hole in itthis lets the ground water in before you marcite it. Then you can turn off the pump in the ground. After you clean it and get ready to plaster it turn the in ground pump on and run it to get all the water is out of the pool. Marcite it and fill right away as you back out of it. When full turn inground pump off and pull it. All pools there now call for a in ground line under the pool in a gravel bed and be up and out of the ground with a cap on it by the deep end. So a pump can but on it anytime the pool has to be worked on
 
  #8  
Old 01-30-08, 09:58 PM
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Cool Can I drain my pool?

Ed- Just a quick question - Why would you drill holes thur the tank of your pool when all you have to do is hook a pump to the deadman line ? The pump will keep pulling the water out from under the pool and then you just remove the pump when your done. Are you suggesting you just fill the holes with marcite? Not trying to start anything but like I said in my previous answer I did this work down there for many (more than I want to admit) yrs. And have re-finished 50 or more pools on the east coast of florida, I think if you tried this you'd find that you could not keep enough water out of the pool to do a proper plaster job. It's not like other places where once you pump out the intial water there is no more. I think the person asking the question is probably not as high above the water table as he thinks as I know of no place in Miami that is 7 feet above sea level. I know this is THE DIY site but this is really not a DIY job. As a side note homeowners who do want to re-finish there own pools should check out products by sider-oxydro-I don't work for them -I do use their products- will be starting a $35,000 remodel on a 56 yr old pool next month using sider products.
 
  #9  
Old 01-30-08, 10:36 PM
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25 years down there just left it.
Why would you drill holes thur the tank of your pool
They all do it and I have on pools I had there. Now this is for old pools. That have no pump out under the pool. you can get by with a sand point by the pool. But why run a pump 24/7 if you are going to work on the pool and it will take time. Put the hole in it and you dont have to run the pump. Also on all new pool. just when they get done gunning it in and smoothed down. If the bottom drain didnt have a plug They just poke a hole in the wet cement. This lets the ground water in while the pool cures. No pump running 24/7On the new pools yes you have to have a drain bed under the pool and a 10ft sand point laying in that bed. This comes up out of the ground close to the pool. This is what you will use to pump the water out of the pool and ground around it. I had 2 new pool and 3 old ones that I had to rework them. AND yes they just use marcite to fill the holes in the bottom
On the new code there now you have to have 2 bottom drains. Also a pipe from that pipe at the bottom drains to come out and up 2ft off the ground with a open U vent on the pipe So a kid cant get stuck to them. Then it calls for the skimmer over flow drain to go out under the deck to a large dry well with felt linner and filled with rocks. This is so water from the pool dont over flow and get out under the deck from the pool.
In West Palm alt there about 19 ft. But you would hit water about 4 ft down. A good well for water you had to go about 92 ft there.
That Sider products do they have the marcite that they all use now called Diamond Bright?? Its sure good and last a longer time. Yes we have a lot that come here that are way in over their heads
 
  #10  
Old 01-31-08, 11:53 AM
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Ed I tend to agree with what your saying, not that the water table is remotely close [ So. Calif. } to what your dealing with, altho close to the beach { Huntington Beach } you definitely will get water entering into the pool all the pools ive seen in that area, have automatic hydrostatic relief valves in them,

from a litigation point of view, .... the drilling of holes would give you an extra margin for error, should the drain pump fail at some point in the repair process, ... believe me we take law suits very seriously here, were probably the sue capitol of the world.

steve
 
  #11  
Old 01-31-08, 06:45 PM
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Cool can I drain....

Ed -Thanks for the reponse. I left Fla. about 15 yrs ago so some things have changed , we used to have to search for the line that you said they put a u in now etc. Steve I knew you were in Cal. because in another answer you stated code required a certain run time for a residential pool. That could only happen in cali ( lol) Here in Alabama there is not even a fence ordinance unless you live within city limits. No county inspectors! Ed the Sider products I mentioned can be rolled on and then troweled and floated with a sponge- Diamond Brite is a great product but the skills required are beyond what most homeowners could do on their own. Sider developed their products so that places like waterparks could use their own people and not have to use special equipment. Although you and I both know some pools have to be sandblasted and that's not a piece of equipment most people have and at least around here you can't rent them anymore for liability reasons. I answer questions on several sites including my own but even I learn new things here! Who said you can't teach an old dog new tricks.
 
  #12  
Old 04-12-08, 04:18 PM
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Finding the Dead Man Line

How do I find the dead man line?

I recently purchased a house and do not know how to find teh dead man line so I can relieve the pressure and avoid the pool from cracking/popping.
 
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