Rust type material staining pool wall?

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  #1  
Old 01-31-08, 12:41 PM
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Rust type material staining pool wall?

A couple years ago I noticed some small rust spots coming out of the pool wall. 2 spots in all. they have gotten progressively worse and they are streaking. Thinking maybe a small hole in the plaster and the rebar is rusting maybe?

I'd like to drain and fix this issue this upcomign summer. Pool is 20K gallon gunite. How would one go about this? here is a pic...you can see them in the bottom right and they are worse now. Please ignore the wife

 
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  #2  
Old 01-31-08, 01:31 PM
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They are more than likely rust stains from where the rebar is to close to surface. Or is there chips where it is coming through? You can drain below the area, using a wet sand paper sand the stain out. Then you'll want to ruffen up the area so you can apply a thin coat of plaster repair. You may want to build it up a little if the rebar is close to surface.
Good luck...
 
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Old 01-31-08, 01:44 PM
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Is there a special type of plaster for pool repairs?
 
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Old 01-31-08, 02:51 PM
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i agree with todrut as to what is causing the rust, however the " fix " is not so simple, you will have to drain the pool so you can properly work on the area, depending upon where your located this may or may not present a problem in its self, check with pool people in your area prior to draining, the offending rebar will have to be cut out, [ & like most of use we use electrical tools, 4 " makita ] looks to be the same horizontal one, when you cut & chip out the plaster you will see it looks like a piramid the more you dig our the worst it will appear untill you uncover the rebar itself, cut the rebar off where it starts back down into the gunite on both ends & remove that piece [ the plaster will normally be 1/3 " to 5/8" thick ], the gunite , [ grey looking concrete mix noramally 6 ' to 8 inches or more ] , after you cut it out clean up the area with muratic acid, dont allow the acid to get on the rest of the plaster as it will etch it, use rubber gloves , use baking soda on the plaster you don't want to harm, you just want to clean any residue of rust away, then use water plug to cover the ends of the rebar you cut, and then make your own patching material using a 50 / 50 mix of white portland cement & marble plaster mix , the consistancy should be plyable but not runny, it will set up , rather quickly apply with a pool plasters trowel, if the mix becomes too firm spray a small amount of water from a spray bottle on the patch & trowel smooth, don't overwork the patch or you will start to see dark trowel marks.

takes, patience, skill, & correct material to get a professional looking finish, if done correctly you will hardly notice it ,
when the repair looks satisfactory, you can fill the pool, use the same procedure plasters use, wrap a rag around the end of your garden hose, place it in the deep end of your pool & turn it on, add 1 qt. of a stain preventative when theres at least 1 ft. of water in the pool, for start-up , see your
pool store for necessary chemicals

this is not the type of repair i would suggest for most do it yourselfers, you will have to decide if you wish to tackle it.

steve
 
  #5  
Old 01-31-08, 03:16 PM
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The point is this is DIY the way I explainedis the easiest for the DIY'er. The way stevie said is for more the professional to do. The main thing as the DIY'er is to get the rust stopped and the stain cleared. Then a patch to stop it from coming back. Good luck either way you decide
 
  #6  
Old 01-31-08, 08:09 PM
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Exclamation Rust type.....

Sorry couldn't ignore the wife... If you love her ask her not to jump from where ever she did!!! I know it's great to be young but it's not great to spend the rest of your life in a wheelchair. Pools are designed to have a certain depth for your size diving board and she didn't get that high off of the board. If you have quests doing this it's a great way to lose your home to a lawyer needing a new bmw!
 
  #7  
Old 01-31-08, 08:23 PM
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I don't swim, and I am too old to care to learn. I have long lost swim suits and don't look as good as the gal in the picture. One question I have is that diving boards are located on the deep end. I am not sure that I understand the words of warning not to jump as this bathing beauty did.

I must add that I have been an owner of many pools despite my inability to swim. Pools are beautiful and very aesthetic in the landscape. I do, however, consider them a pain when it comes to maintenance, despite the thrill for guests.

I do, however, ditto Stevie3x's recommendations. If not repaired properly, the oxidation will continue to be an ongoing problem.
 
  #8  
Old 01-31-08, 09:36 PM
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Cool Rust type...

The young lady in the picture did not jump from the diving board. Or if she did there is an optical illusion going on but I would bet this weeks paycheck that she jumped from a second floor balcony, the same one the photographer was standing on. I have seen all types of homemade diving platforms added to pools and pools are not designed for you to jump from an extended height. That is why pools for dive teams are over 13 feet deep and not eight and a half as most residential pools are. Side note:It is also against code for anyone to add a slide where the person coming off the slide will be in the dive envelop of someone coming off the diving board. These can be touchy subjects when a homeowner insists on doing it but any professional who goes out to a job where this type of thing is happening has a duty to stop it or could be sued as the last professional on the site. Sorry if I wasn't clear on what she was doing wrong.
 
  #9  
Old 02-03-08, 06:44 PM
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Well you get to keep your paycheck. We have a large deck that goes around the second story of our house and that is where she jumped from.
 
  #10  
Old 02-03-08, 09:35 PM
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rust type ....

Thanks for the reply scary. It's good to know I get to hang on to my 3 bucks.lol It really is a super dangerous thing to do tho and believe it or not I've had customers who were sued and lost by the way after only owning their pool a week . A neighbor came to their first pool party and got drunk and decided to dive in the shallow end of the pool and broke his neck. Even tho he was drunk and dove in the wrong end they still lost. Most people injured in diving accidents are first time users of the pool and are aren't familar with the layout but.... like I said if your pool wasn't designed for it you shouldn't do it. And just because you didn't get hurt the last ten times doesn't mean you won't get hurt the eleventh. In fact your chances will go up because you'll get better at it meaning cleaner dives or jumps which equal deeper water penatration etc..just something to think about.
 
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