Hit water when digging new pool


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Old 10-10-08, 08:04 PM
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Hit water when digging new pool

Poolbuilder warned us prior to even signing contract if we hit water when digging it would cost an extra $800-$1,000 to remedy. Well, we hit water (mostly sandy soil, was very wet down by 8ft deep end and they actualy hit clay). Foreman advised me, and the remedy was to dig another 2ft down, install a drain and pump, and fill the two feet with stone. As they dug deeper, ground was pretty wet. They said if we didn't put in a pump/drain and they come back to install the steel panels, there could be standing water in the bottom, making the rest of the install difficult. Also, they said after the pool is complete, if water table rises and pushes against liner (vermiculite is porous) it can cause bubbles, and if we ever need to replace the liner, we don't want water down below.

Well, pump has been on for 1 1/2 days, and some water is coming out. Looks like a temporary pump, and when they are complete they will not leave a pump connected, but leave an access for us to hook up a pump if needed. Why in the world would this cost 800-1000?? Took an extra hour (if that) to dig the extra 2 feet and install the drain. How much can 10 tons of stone cost?? plus 30' of flexible pvc pipe?? certainly not $800.
 
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Old 10-11-08, 07:17 AM
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It is called a contractors line and is very common. Sounds like they did it properly however when I build a pool and need to install I always leave the pump on pump pad where all other equipment is going. You will need to use when replacing liner or if water level drops in pool. Question them why so much and not leaving the pump????
 
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Old 10-11-08, 09:55 AM
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$800?

Took an extra hour (if that) to dig the extra 2 feet and install the drain.
by hand or with excavator?
Big difference.

by hand around $100-$150 bucks (2 man hours)
excavator- closer to $2-300

pea gravel varies by the area but I would guess around $30/ton so 10 tons would be around $300.

pipe? depending what it is and size and length but PVC is derived from petroleum so the costs have increased greatly in recent years

use of their pump $??.

Knowledge of what to do;

priceless.

Doesn't sound unreasonable to me although I am with todrut with this and a permanent pipe and pump should be installed. It wounds like this is all intended as a temporary dewatering system.
 
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Old 10-12-08, 08:18 PM
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Extra 2 feet was dug by excavator, which was already in process of digging pool.

the pad for the filter has not yet been poured (I believe it will be poured tomorrow when the concrete truck arrives to pour the collar). The pump is sitting next to where the pad will go, but the pump is dirty and old-looking, like it's something they use on the job. For all I know they may install a new pump later on, which makes sense. I will wait until I get the separate bill and if it is 800-1000 I will question it.

The bottom of the deep end still appears damp, and the concrete/sand mixture that they hand troweled has not completely dried there, so I do believe I needed the pump - water still pumping out today - not much, but enough to make me think it was the right decision.

Thanks.
 
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Old 10-17-08, 07:33 AM
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Just got the bill for "hitting water" and it includes the flat initial charge of $1,000 - which includes all labor and "transportation" of material needed (stone), but no pump. The bill stated 15 Tons of stone at $40/ton ($600) plus the $1,000. I could sware the foreman told the driver to get 10 tons, so I need to question this charge. I thought they dug down about 2 or 3 feet, and the dimensions at the bottom where they were digging is 6' X 10'6". I believe 1 ton would cover an area of 10'X10' at a depth of 1'. Given these figures, how in the world would you justify 15 tons??? Am I doing something wrong here?
 
 

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