Hayward 1.5 hp pump overheats

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  #1  
Old 05-25-09, 05:24 PM
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Hayward 1.5 hp pump overheats

Hi guys - from what I've read so far, there is definitely someone out there who can answer this question for me. We just hooked up our new pump and sand filter for our inground pool (16 x 32). It took quite a while to prime the pump (we have now realized we should probably have filled the filter with water before we started the priming process - just a hint for future reference) but once it got going, it seemed to hum along nicely except that after about 5 minutes there was a burny smell (reminiscent of starting the furnace for the first time in the fall) and the pump was running so hot we could not touch it. We thought we had it wired correctly - for 220 - but I think the connection from the house is only 115. I say this because, my panel points to 2 15s for the pool, but I think only one breaker is controlling the pool pump and the other 15 controls the lights in the pool shed and in my garage - where the breaker box is located. I read, in one of the responses here, that 115 is for an above-ground while 220 is for inground pools. Our pump is preset for 220. First of all - what do you say about the wiring based on what I have told you? Second, if it's not a wiring issue - why do you think the pump ran so hot we couldn't touch it? I sure hope I haven't confused you - because I'm at the end of my rope trying to figure this out. Thanks so much - any help you can give me (us) will be greatly appreciated.
 
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  #2  
Old 05-25-09, 05:35 PM
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Have no fear, the pump can be ran on 110v it just uses a little more electric. Running 220v runs more efficiently. Should be a switch or wire in the back to move to run in 110v that should take care of it. Good luck...
 
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Old 05-25-09, 05:40 PM
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WE tried moving the switch to 115 - the circuit failed immediately. Now what? Could it be because we got the pump drenched when we were priming it and water got inside the housing?
 
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Old 05-25-09, 06:17 PM
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Yes it could be because you got it wet. Are you sure you have the wires properly connected?
 
  #5  
Old 05-26-09, 04:25 AM
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That's the question of the day. We have the wires connected for 220; but I am not at all certain that my husband has them connected to the proper place. Sounds funny? yes - I agree. Anyway - inside the pump, there were two very short pieces of wire connected already. We didn't know what they were for - but they are 'exposed' and serve no purpose. My husband didn't know if he should remove them and connect the new wires in their place, or if he should connect the new wires to the screws in back of the 'exposed' wires. So - he connected the new wires to the screws - in fear that if he removed the 'exposed' wires, he would screw up the pump. hmmmm Anyway, the pump does run so what he did does not appear to be entirely correct. However, when we looked inside the pump after realizing it was running far too hot, we noticed that the 'exposed' wires were cinged at the ends? I am in a quandry, now, as to whether we should remove those 'exposed' wires and connect the new wires in their place? We are going to try the pump, as it is now, this morning to see if it runs better now that it might have dried out a bit. However, I would like to know what you think about the 'exposed' wire issue - have you ever come across this - and what to do with those wires?
 
  #6  
Old 05-27-09, 09:04 AM
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Pumps and motors can run hot for a variety of reasons:
1. Incorrect supply voltage
2. Insufficient wire size on power supply to motor/pump. You should be using at least a #12 wire from the breaker to the pump.
3. Failure of some sort inside the motor.
Direct sunlight will make the motor run hotter, but not likely as hot as you're describing.

First, Use a voltage meter to verify what voltage you are supplying the pump with. Second, set the motor wires to the correct configuration for that voltage. Some pumps will only work on 240v. There is usually a diagram on the outside of the electric motor that shows the different diagrams for 120v/240v.

The "exposed wires" that came with the pump are there to show you where to hook up your wires, and can be removed without harm. The "singed" look may be from arcing or something similar, or could be caused by the overheat. Make sure you have the green ground wire connected inside the motor as well as the "bond" wire on the outside. The bond wire is generally a bare copper wire that runs around your pool equipment.

Most motors have a thermal switch inside the motor that will shut the motor off if it is overheating badly. You may notice this as the motor "cycling" off and on by itself. Splashing the motor with water should not cause the overheating, unless it's done on a regular basis. These motors are UL approved for outdoor installations and are resistant to damage from natural moisture such as rainfall. Make sure you don't have a sprinkler head that douses your equipment daily, as this can shorten the life of the motor and other electrical equipment.
 
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