Resurface Pool deck area?

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  #1  
Old 06-18-13, 07:17 AM
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Resurface Pool deck area?

HI. I have a small area on the pool deck with rocks that had a big sphere lamp on a metal post along with an electrical box. I removed the light fixture and covered the box. I want/need to remove this completely, get rid of the rocks, even out the surface and put something more toddler friendly so my kids don't fall but also don't hurt their feet when walking. To complicate the matter, the small area is shaped like a "water drop". I can go on and on trying to explain but a picture is worth 1 million words in this case. I was thinking of putting some sort of rubberized surface, but how do I cut it to shape? how about wood interlocking squares? Can I cut those?. Also, how can I remove the rocks and the metal electrical parts? How to cover and with what? Thanks a lot for any help!.
 
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  #2  
Old 06-18-13, 12:09 PM
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One of the electricians here may have an idea on the box, but I would think you could dig down below ground level and cut things off, provided there are no wires in there.

As for a replacement for the rocks, what about interlocking rubber squares like this:

Amazon.com: Multi-Purpose Reversible (Bright Colors or Neutral Charcoal) Foam Floor Mats (BIG Tiles 25" x 25" x .53"!!!), Anti-fatigue Mat, for Business, Home, Basement, Workshop, Kitchen, Children's Rooms (Child Safe), Pool Area, Gym and Exercis
 
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Old 06-18-13, 12:10 PM
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Just took a closer look and realized it looks like the rocks have some kind of mortar securing them? Will make removal a bit more labor intensive.
 
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Old 06-18-13, 12:38 PM
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I'd knock out everything protruding and use a concrete resurfacer or sand mix to make it even with the surrounding area.
 
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Old 06-18-13, 02:16 PM
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Thanks guys, yes I would have to work those rocks out that are attached and have some concrete or similar material to level and create the surface before adding anything else. I though about wood interlocking squares or rubber squares but the question is how do I secure them (or glue them) to the bottom and how can I cut them (rubber or wood) to shape and mimick the drop. IT has to look good. The curve there is important.
 
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Old 06-18-13, 02:45 PM
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You have a concrete sidewalk, the concrete edge and of course the biggest hazard of all..the pool itself.

Trying to make that little part "kid safe" would seem to be pretty low on the list of safety issues.

Make it flat, smooth, and level and it's just an extension of the sidewalk.
 
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Old 06-18-13, 04:39 PM
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It's unusual to see a surface you can't walk on right next to the pool coping.
Also unusual to see a receptacle that close to the pool water.

In order to remove that electrical box you'll need to determine where it's being fed from now so that it could be disconnected.

I've seen that smooth rock type walkway next to the pool but usually the rocks are at the same level and even with the cement.

I was going to bring up the point of an expansion joint between the coping and what you are adding but you won't need it in Fl.
 
  #8  
Old 06-18-13, 07:49 PM
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The pool deck area is some kind of concrete that needs to be pressure washed once in a while. That drop shaped place is exactly were my toddlers (3 1/2 years old boy and 1 1/2 girl) stand to jump to us. (parents waiting inside the pool) Is next to the steps and the shallow part of the pool. It hurts me to walk over that, imagine them!. As far as the light fixture, there was a huge glass globe at 1 feet off the ground, totally unsafe but the pool was done in 1963 so I guess it complied to the code (if there was any) of the time. Now is just terrible. I was able to cover the box and cut the thick metal pole. There is no switch to be found that works there nor there is electricity coming to the box. So I need to flatten that surface and cover the box/pole completely below ground after removing it. I would not mind having a flat non slip surface like concrete and paint it, but I was looking for some nicer and safer (but cheap and doable) alternatives or ideas. Would love to put some rubber color thing there (remember this is where the kids jump and walk) but need to know how to attach it to the bottom and how to cut it to shape. thanks guys
 
  #9  
Old 06-19-13, 01:59 PM
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HI PJmax: what do you mean by "expansion joint"? I guess the coping is the area around the pool?
Also, what kind of cement or concrete or mix should I use in this area?
 
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Old 06-19-13, 06:48 PM
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The coping is the fancy cement like shelf around the top of the pool.

Didn't mean to confuse the issue. Up here in the North (NJ) due to the cold temps.......we have to separate sections of concrete/cement with an expansion joint so that when they expand and contract they don't crack. I don't believe you have that issue in Fl.

My pool has the identical same coping that your pool does. I have a 3/4" poured rubber expansion joint between the coping and the sidewalk.

I have an area in my backyard where I have a water feature.. a fountain. In front of that fountain looks just like the rocks and cement that you have except that I have the rocks all even and the cement is even with the tops of the rocks. It's a fairly flat area and can be walked on without hurting the feet.
 
  #11  
Old 06-19-13, 08:54 PM
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great, thanks so much for the info. Now suppose that I remove the rocks and cut out the box and pole. What kind of cement or mix or concrete should I put in that space, considering the application?
Thanks.
 
  #12  
Old 06-19-13, 11:44 PM
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You could use Sakrete Concrete or their Maximizer product.

Benefits of using Sakrete Maximizer Concrete Mix | Sakrete Video
 
  #13  
Old 06-21-13, 08:33 AM
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From the look or your "coping" in comparison to the rocks it appears as if the original concrete has washed away or deteriorated thereby exposing the edge of the coping that should be level with the concrete surronding the rocks. The original concrete level probably covered the majority of those rocks making it a flat surface.

I'd start with a jack hammer and expose the electrical box and pipe so you can cut them below the surface. The electrical box you have now should have an access hole in the back as it does in each end. Lay it flat so when you refinish the concrete you have it at the same level as the finished product.

My main concern is the proximity to the pool and exposure to water splashing out of the pool onto and possibly into the electrical box. I'd seriously hire a licensed electrician to come in and eliminate the wiring that feeds that box and eliminate that box entirely.

When you have the electricial situation contained resurface the deck area with a type of concrete and finish it smooth to the tops of those rocks which was probably the original finished product. I have the same coping and finish but mine is done with a pea gravel that only has stones the size of small marbles or less.

There are a lot of concrete/expoxy finishes on the market these days that would work good on raising the level to the top of those rocks to give you a smooth surface when trowled. Standard concrete mixes will not last because you don't have enough depth and it will crack a chip bringing you back to where you started. Don't skimp on the finish product.
 
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Old 06-21-13, 10:05 AM
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thanks, houston1369. Very valuable info. I still don't know exactly what coping is but I guess is the surrounding stones of the pool. A Licensed electrician came in for other things and he covered the box after checking the wires and chopped the useless glass lamp. I wanted it totally removed but I guess he didn't want to work that much or would have asked for more money I guess. I am concern with working with concrete, specially with the finish. I have never poured concrete and It has to look good. Good tip about the depth level and possible cracks!. My pool is enclosed on a safety net for my kids, so that "tear drop" area is the only surface where you can walk, jump or play inside the poo; and it is next to the steps into it. I need that area clean, leveled and smooth. IF I pour concrete I guess I would have to also leave a space in between the coping and the concrete, kind of like making a mold, wondering how I would do that. Also I was thinking of adding some mozaic or some kind of "irregular" pattern or figure just to mask an imperfect concrete finish. What can I add? I know it's too many questions but I am willing to do it and can't afford a handyman nor an electrician again. Thanks guys! SEE ATTACHED PICTURE
 
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Old 06-21-13, 10:13 AM
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See attached picture here
 
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Old 06-21-13, 10:45 AM
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Concrete is really not that hard to work with. But I still don't think you will want concrete. A topping mix or resurfacer MIGHT be all thats needed for that shallow an area after the stones are removed. And its pretty easy to get a sand mix smooth since there is no larger aggregate in it. Since you have an enclosed area, it should be easy to level and smooth it using the edges as a guide. You'll need some basic tools (shovel, wheelbarrow, hoe, float, edger, etc) and a helper, but the concrete tools are pretty cheap or you may be able to borrow/rent them. The helper is sometimes the tough part.

QUIKRETEŽ - Sand/Topping Mix

You'll need to figure the average depth after it's cleaned out and calculate the amount needed....but we can help with that.
 
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Old 06-24-13, 07:38 AM
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Your design is pretty well defined by the pea gravel or stones that are in place at this time. You don't really have enough depth to add any addtional items. When you complete the troweling you'll expose the tops of some of the existing stones. This is what was originally intended for this type of finish but your concrete finish has deteriorated and washed out from between these rocks.

The info from Gunguy with a link to the Quickcrete products is a great start and a product designed for what you're doing. There is also an expoxy based product on the market for just this type of repair that has an adhesive property that will adhere to your existing concrete and stone but it's been too long and I can't remember the maker or the name.

As Gunguy pointed out, you surface level is defined by the "coping" that also determines the depth of your pour. You'll need a trowel which will scim over the top of the existing rocks at the perfect level. If you want to expose more of the rocks you can do a final finish before it completely sets up with a broom. The "broom finish" is very common and you will see it on every sidewalk and driveway. I wouldn't get too concerned about making an expansion joint between the rocky surface and your coping but I'll defer that to someone else.

Clean the surface, mix your patch material, pour it, trowel it, let it set awhile (an hour) and broom finish it, take a swim the next day.
 
  #18  
Old 06-25-13, 11:18 AM
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Thanks houston1369, very clear and to the point.
now I don't know what a trowel ir, "that will scim" (what is scim??) never saw that word.
Now how much patch material (quickcrete) do I need or How can I calculate how much do I need considering the shape I am dealing with?
ALso, you are saying not to worry about leaving a space in between the wall or the coping and just fill it out?
 
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Old 06-25-13, 11:29 AM
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Also, I need to dig a little bit to cut the pole and electrical box so it does not protude and gets buried.
 
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Old 06-25-13, 11:52 AM
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I think he meant "skim" not scim. A straight 2x4 long enough to span from walk to coping will be needed initially. Using that you can find any stones that need to be taken out if you want it smooth like the sidewalk. You'll want AT LEAST 1/2" of mix to keep down the cracking. Even then you might want to use a groover to put some lines in it. At least it would crack ON the lines hopefully.

As to the amount...I would make some measurements and treat the area as 1/2 a teardrop shape. Cut most of the pointy part off and consider it a circle. So it would be 1/2 the area of a circle X the avg depth will make it a shallow cylinder. Plenty of calculators online for figuring area of a circle and volume of a cylinder. Will have to convert from cubic inches to cubic feet which is what the mix is calculated at per bag.

The mix is cheap...buy 1 or 2 more than you think you need at your best large estimate. Post some measurements on a marked up pic and we can help out.


A simple search for types of concrete tools will give pics and descriptions. Maybe $20 for what you need except for the garden tools I mentioned earlier.
 
  #21  
Old 06-25-13, 01:21 PM
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Ok, but now: what is a groover and what do you mean exactly by: "you might want to use a groover to put some lines in it" ?? some lines????
 
  #22  
Old 06-25-13, 01:51 PM
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Oh...come on...you have to do a little research on your own...lol.

This search tell you all you need to know..."use of a concrete groover".

A groover is a tool that you use to put some grooved lined in the mix so that when it expands and contracts it will crack in the groove...not just randomly.

You'll need to find a pattern that looks good..won't take many..and only really needed in the larger areas, with one to separate the large area from the smaller one.
 
  #23  
Old 06-25-13, 02:29 PM
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I did my research and I found out about the groover and the trowel and I watched a video about making those lines. The reason why I ask you guys is in relation to my specific situation. I learned the hard way, while doing staff in the house, if you don't know what you are doing it can be a mess. So watching a super pro guy pouring concrete and using a groover or whatever tool or machine doesn't mean that I can come even close to doing the same. I can tell you how to play the upright bass, use a bow, a music stand and voila: you start reading music, its very easy! but hey..thanks a lot for the tips and the help!.
 
  #24  
Old 06-25-13, 03:21 PM
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Well...you have more mad skills than me! Music takes coordination and memory.....I remember to put one foot in front of the other...most of the time.

Seriously, I'm sure you'll do fine as long as you follow directions on the bag and get rid of the big stones. Perfect? Maybe not. Adequate? Most likely.

And...if it's not really to your liking...it will be ok until you decide to re-do it or pay someone to fix it.
 
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