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Jacuzzi J-355 Pump Problems - Tripping GFI Breaker

Jacuzzi J-355 Pump Problems - Tripping GFI Breaker

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  #1  
Old 06-17-14, 10:17 AM
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Jacuzzi J-355 Pump Problems - Tripping GFI Breaker

I've got a Jacuzzi J-355. The GFI Breaker trips almost immediately when I fire up one of the hot tub pumps. I have narrowed this issue down by systematically disconnecting the ozonator, heater, and Pump #1. Those all work correctly.

The issue is with the single-speed Pump #2. When Pump #2 is turned on, water will shoot out of the jets for 1 or 2 seconds or less, then the breaker will trip.

I need some advice on further troubleshooting. I've ohmed out the leads on the pump, and it reads 1.5 ohms, so I don't think the windings are blown. Especially since the motor starts up and blows water for a second or two

Could it be the run capacitor? Or maybe a problem with the pump or impeller?
The pump is Jacuzzi Part number: 6500-341

If anyone has any experience with this issue, your help would be appreciated.

Thanks
 
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  #2  
Old 06-17-14, 06:07 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

You need to disconnect the pump from power. Since that is a 240v motor.... check from each hot wire to the motor case. Depending on what type of meter you are using you want to set the ohms scale high..... like Rx100 or rx1000 scale. Auto setting on digital is ok. You should see no continuity between either motor lead and ground/motor frame.
 
  #3  
Old 06-18-14, 01:59 PM
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OK. That makes sense. I guess I only confirmed that the winding wasn't blown. I will check that this evening to see if the windings are shorted. Thanks
 
  #4  
Old 06-20-14, 06:26 AM
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I checked to see if there were any shorts. From each hot wire to the case, it was completely open. I've pulled the capacitor, now I just need to test it. If the capacitor is good, I guess I will have to drain the tub, pull the motor and pump and dig deeper.
 
  #5  
Old 06-21-14, 12:36 AM
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What type of meter are you using and what do you have it set for ?

The capacitor should have no bearing on this problem. A GFI detects an inbalance or a leak between hot and ground.
 
  #6  
Old 06-21-14, 05:10 AM
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Thanks for the reply PJmax.

I've got a digital multimeter that can test capacitors and give the capacity in Farads. The capicitor tests "bad". Besides the meter test, the capacitor is bulging, and won't hold any voltage.

I should have been more clear. The 60a breaker is tripping. The breaker has a GFI built into it, but there does not appear to be a ground fault, just too much current draw.

My guess is that the start windings are spinning the motor, which spits out some water from the jets. As soon as it switches to the main windings, it draws too much current and trips the breaker, since the capacitor isn't doing its job.

I'll get a new capacitor and get it replaced in the next week. I'll report back with my progress.
 
  #7  
Old 06-21-14, 12:56 PM
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Possibly the capacitor is shorting internally to the case causing the GFI breaker to trip. If that breaker tripped due to high current draw you would probably see smoke or smell something burning.

When a motor is first powered up..... both windings are active. The start winding needs to shut off a split second after power up. Both windings remaining active for over a few seconds will start generating heat very quickly.
 
  #8  
Old 06-24-14, 05:33 PM
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Problem resolved. I've replaced the capacitor and it is working fine now.

As PJMax correctly stated, it is probable that the bad capacitor was causing a ground-fault. The cap had swelled enough for one of the terminals to leave a small "nick" in the protective pad inside of the capacitor housing.

Thanks for the replies!
 
  #9  
Old 06-24-14, 10:40 PM
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Awesome job ...... Thanks for letting us know what you found.
 
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