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Care of water for Intex PureSpa Inflatable hot tub

Care of water for Intex PureSpa Inflatable hot tub

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  #1  
Old 08-19-16, 03:13 AM
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Care of water for Intex PureSpa Inflatable hot tub

I had owned two large fiberglass hot tubs in the past but long time ago. I also used to own an above ground pool years ago.

I know that keeping the water chemical balance just right means everything in enjoying the hot tub.

Just received this inflatable hot tub about 3 days ago. It holds about 210 gallons of water and is the perfect size for me and my friend to hang in the tub and enjoy it.

After I get paid today I need to go to a pool/spa supply store and buy some chemicals for the tub. My other two tubs had the full filtration system with ozonator built in so keeping the water clean was easier. Just added a little shock here and there when many people used it at once.

The tub came with a chart for the different levels needed such as Ph, chlorine, alkalinity etc. It also has a chlorine float you place in the water which releases it gradually. I remember when treating my swimming pool I used to use Arm and Hammer baking soda as a substitute for one of the chemicals but just don't remember what one it was. As I said I am going to a spa store later today or tomorrow and want to buy only the chemicals that I really need. I don't want the salesperson loading up my arms with this and that and then paying $180 for chemicals that will last me 2 years.

The tub comes with a built in hard water treatment system to start with. It also has two filter cartridges mounted to the inside outer wall of the tub. I keep the filtration system running all the time but it does shut off after 3 days automatically. I just have to remember to start it again.

Meantime, what chemicals should I really be buying today. I know I need a water test kit and they range in price but needed. Tub comes with a few test strips but prefer the water test kit instead.

Any suggestions would be highly appreciated.
 
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  #2  
Old 08-19-16, 05:29 AM
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What you need will depend on your water. Have you tested your water? Without that you'll be shopping blind.
 
  #3  
Old 08-20-16, 03:51 AM
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Had to empty the tub and move to a better location. Water has now been in it for about 36 hours. Results of test strips are as follows. It does have a hard water treatment system. The water is already starting to smell very musty. I have not added any chemicals yet and have had the filter going non=stop since I filled it.

Calcium hardness - low
total Alka - low
ph - low
free chlo - low


Thanks
 
  #4  
Old 08-20-16, 05:08 AM
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Well now you've got a chance to get your baking soda back out.
 
  #5  
Old 08-20-16, 05:16 AM
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Well now you've got a chance to get your baking soda back out.
Yes, but I don't remember what chemical I substituted the baking soda for.
 
  #6  
Old 08-20-16, 08:23 AM
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Baking soda is used to raise the total alkalinity and it also raises the PH. Many spa products that raise total alkalinity are sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) so it's not really substituting. It's more like using the generic.
 
  #7  
Old 08-20-16, 09:26 AM
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Baking soda is used to raise the total alkalinity and it also raises the PH. Many spa products that raise total alkalinity are sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) so it's not really substituting. It's more like using the generic.
Oh, ok. Understand.
So the lady at the spa/pool store (bought all chemicals I needed before i got this) was telling me that using baking soda knocks off the true reading of the chemicals and makes it harder to balance them. So now I am wondering if I should have bought the Alkalinity stuff and saved some money.
 
  #8  
Old 08-20-16, 01:55 PM
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Most total alkalinity increasers use sodium bicarbonate which takes a while to totally dissolve. Just add your baking soda and run the pump. Then check the water again in 4-6 hours and you should get an accurate reading.
 
  #9  
Old 08-21-16, 04:52 AM
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Ok, thanks for that explanation. Appreciated!!
 
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